Romuald Hazoumé: Contemporary African Masks

10 Mar

Contmeporary African Masks made with found objects, mostly gasoline canisters, Romuald Hazoume, Armory Show 2014Contmeporary African Masks made with found objects, mostly gasoline canisters, Romuald Hazoume, Armory Show 2014Contmeporary African Masks made with found objects, mostly gasoline canisters, Romuald Hazoume, Armory Show 2014It’s been an art-intense week in NYC, with more art fairs in town than time to view them. I did, however, get to almost all of them and will cover some of the highlights for me, sporadically over the next couple of weeks. Overall, and very in general, I continue to have a bit of a weakness for VoltaNY and The Armory Show, but Spring/Break was a nice surprise, with its edgier works and installations and its very topical theme of PublicPrivate. Less surprising were Scope and Fountain, which seemed to have a lot of repeats from previous years, but then, arriving at Fountain after over four hours at the piers might not have been the freshest way to take it all in. The banners hanging from the upper floor were pretty great, though.

So first here, from the Armory Show, are West African artist Romuald Hazoumé’s whimsical contemporary African masks made using discarded plastic containers, in particular gasoline canisters. Though the masks link to the artist’s heritage, they also represent his critical vision of political systems. “I send back to the West that which belongs to them, that is to say, the refuse of consumer society that invades us every day.” Hazoumé was at the Armory booth when I was there, explaining to a small group that in several of these masks, the hair was very telling of a woman’s relationship status. For example: the criss-crossed braids topping the black diamond-shaped mask represents a woman who is content, but not thrilled by her husband. The yellow jug with the bunched up hair on top, is a woman who is thrilled by her man. The blue canister with the twisted braids shooting out and turning downwards, is a very dissatisfied woman. So, there you have it. Romuald Hazoumés masks reminded me a little of Willie Cole’s shoe masks (here), and whose work was nicely featured at Volta this year, including this fun sculpture made using irons.

Photos: collabcubed

One Response to “Romuald Hazoumé: Contemporary African Masks”

  1. revuemeteque April 12, 2014 at 4:13 am #

    Splendid ! Please contact-me at revuemeteque@gmail.com. I would like plublis your red mask into my magazin of art Revue Métèque.

    Kind regard,
    Jean-François DALLE

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