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Corsage/Boutonniere Redux: Daniela Gilsanz

19 Mar

Corsage and Boutonniere by Daniela Gilsanz, fun alternative to the classic for prom or other events, jewelry, accessories for prom, fun gift itemCorsage and Boutonniere by Daniela Gilsanz, fun alternative to the classic for prom or other events, jewelry, accessories for prom, fun gift itemSpring is fast approaching (like, tomorrow…yay!) and along with the lovely season come school proms, weddings, and other formal occasions where the purchase of a corsage or boutonniere may be warranted. If you’d like to deviate from the classic floral variety, we’ve got Daniela’s clever Corsage/Boutonniere bracelet/pin combos right here. Be the talk of your event and the envy of every type-crazed participant (surely there’s at least a couple in any crowd) when you and your date show up donning these fun pieces. Limited supply so order soon…

Michael Goodward: Sculptural Humor

18 Mar

Michael Goodward, humorous sculptural objects, Me compass, typography, contemporary artMichael Goodward, humorous sculptural objects, Hair brush made with hair,, contemporary artMichael Goodward, humorous sculptural objects, contemporary artSwitzerland-based, British artist, Michael Goodward makes art “with a serious smile and a wry mind.” His humorous sculptures and installations are eclectic and a manifestation of the curious way he occupies his time with anything that is remotely connected with the nature of being and man’s perception of the world within and around him. Themes such as death, religion, and existence are represented through the artist’s view. And if the works themselves don’t make you break into a smile automatically, some of the titles sure will: the Me compass which is also referred to as sartresample 1; the curiously literal hairbrush is titled Something or Other; the pie at the bottom is Humble Pie; and the S/M arty-pants with their nails penetrating areas that might want to avoid nails, definitely should evoke a chuckle, if maybe one combined with a wince.

via saatchi

Fashion by Mayhem

28 Feb

Paper dresses made by a 4-year-old and her mother, dresses made from paper, Fashion by Mayhem, 2sisters_angie, crafts with kids, funPaper dresses made by a 4-year-old and her mother, dresses made from paper, Fashion by Mayhem, 2sisters_angie, crafts with kids, funPaper dresses made by a 4-year-old and her mother, dresses made from paper, Fashion by Mayhem, 2sisters_angie, crafts with kids, funYes, this is probably all over the internet by now, but how could we, a mother-daughters design blog not post about it? Even if the daughters are in their 20s. But this 4-year-old daughter and mother collaboration is right up our alley and my only regret is that we didn’t think of it ourselves. Mom Angie, noticed her 4-year-old “Mayhem” opting to dress herself up in scarves and sheets over her store-bought princess dresses while playing. Clearly interested in fashion, Angie suggested they make their own dress out of paper and Mayhem jumped at the idea. The rest, as they say, is history. Nine months later, the mother-daughter collaboration has yielded dozens of designs—with 50/50 contribution on the creative concepts—that have been posted to an instagram account. Mayhem contributes much more than one would think to the construction of these dresses, having even made a couple completely on her own. Their inspirations vary from My Little Pony to the Golden Globes’ red carpet and the results are unbelievably cute as well as impressive. The most ironic part? Angie, the mom, is not a particularly crafty or fashionable person. As for Mayhem? I think she’ll likely be on Project Runway before we know it.

You can see many more of these delightful designs and photos over here and here.

All photos courtesy Fashion by Mayhem.

via swissmiss

Michael Johansson: Model Kit Sculptures

29 Jan

Michael Johansson, everyday objects and toy-model-like sculptures, contemporary, humorous, sculpture, dinghyMichael Johansson, everyday objects and toy-model-like sculptures, contemporary, humorous, sculpture, dinghyMichael Johansson, everyday objects and toy-model-like sculptures, contemporary, humorous, sculpture, engine bought separatelySwedish artist Michael Johansson takes everyday objects apart and rejoins the pieces in a welded metal frame, coating them with a unifying layer of plastic, ultimately simulating the look of a snap-apart model kit, something Johansson is very familiar with having spent much of his childhood making toy models. There’s obvious humor in these, but the titles such as Toys’r’Us – Dingy Scale 1:1 and Engine Bought Separately leave it completely unambiguous.

And then there’s this aspect of his work…

via thetreemag

NONEON: Fabian Thiele

24 Jan

Noneon, recycled sign letters converted into lights by Fabian Thiele. FrankfurtNoneon, recycled sign letters converted into lights by Fabian Thiele. FrankfurtNoneon, recycled sign letters converted into lights by Fabian Thiele. FrankfurtI certainly know where I’ll be headed if I find myself in Frankfurt. NONEON is a small shop/gallery run by designer Fabian Thiele who has been collecting letters from old signs and fixing them up, making them into lights, all, apparently, affordable to boot. Just seeing these piles of illuminated type makes me happy. The shop is only open on Fridays and Saturdays so, if this appeals to you next time in Frankfurt, make sure to plan accordingly. Recycling at its best.

via luminapolis

Icepop Generator: MELT

23 Jan

Icepop Generator concept by MELT. 3D printed icepops. Self-portrait icepopsIcepop Generator concept by MELT. 3D printed icepops. Self-portrait icepopsIcepop Generator concept by MELT. 3D printed icepops. Self-portrait icepopsIt was only a matter of time before 3D printing turned to food, or vice versa. There have been some spectacularly beautiful pieces (actually, too beautiful to put in your coffee!) made with sugar, and now there is talk of Hershey teaming up with 3D Systems to create, I assume, some amazing things with chocolate. So, it shouldn’t come as a big surprise that Dutch company MELT is creating an the Icepop Generator to bring personalized ice pops to the public while educating them in 3D design technology. It appears, however, that the Icepop Generator works more on a carving and chiseling process rather than actually 3D printing an ice pop from frozen water but, it’s amazing nonetheless. Starting with a block of ice, the generator (which looks like many 3D printers with the twist of doubling as a freezer) has a sort of drill that moves back and forth along three axes, carving out the designated design, in effect, functioning as a mechanical sculptor. The Icepop Generator was just funded yesterday on Voordekunst—a Dutch funding platform similar to Kickstarter—so these pops are likely to be at a street fair or festival near you in the not-so-distant future. In the meantime the creative team at MELT has made several a pop, some in their own image. You can see how it works in this video:

via notcot and 3ders

DipJar: Ryder Kessler

17 Jan

Credit card tipping gadget DipJar by Ryder KesslerCredit card tipping gadget DipJar by Ryder KesslerCredit card tipping gadget DipJar by Ryder KesslerThe other day I passed by Fresco Gelateria/Café and was reminded of the last time I was in there with a friend who noticed an interesting gadget on their counter. “Meet DipJar—” as the sign reads, “the first ever tip jar for credit and debit cards.” This nicely designed (by industrial designer Simon Enever) stainless cylindrical vessel charges your credit card a dollar tip with one quick swipe or, more precisely, “dip” of your card. This clever product is the brainchild of Ryder Kessler who, after chatting with several baristas, learned that along with the uptick of credit and debit card use for small purchases came the plummeting of cash jar tips. In a world where printed currency is fast becoming a thing of the past, replaced by credit and bitcoins, this is just another example of smart design following in the footsteps of Square and the less successful waving-of-cell-phones for subway entry. This is good news for industrial designers! Bad news for cheapskates: not having change or singles is no longer a valid excuse to avoid tipping.

FlipBooKit Moto

15 Jan

FlipBooKit Moto by WEndy Marvel & Mark Rosen, Kinteic ArtistsFlipBooKit Moto by WEndy Marvel & Mark Rosen, Kinteic ArtistsFlipBooKit Moto by WEndy Marvel & Mark Rosen, Kinteic ArtistsWho doesn’t like a good flipbook, right? And your very own? Even better. A few years back I made a couple of flipbooks of my kids when they were little via flipclips which were a hit, but now kinetic artists Wendy Marvel and Mark Rosen have taken the concept to a whole new level with their FlipBooKit Moto, a motorized animated flip book. Based on their own artworks inspired by the motion studies of Eadweard Muybridge, the duo applied the same techniques they use in their sculptural mechanical flipbooks to a DIY kit. It’s easy to assemble— you’ll only need a screwdriver—and will take less than an hour to complete. You can use the included art or use your own images, the possibilities are limitless! Looks like a great gift idea. You can hear more about it in the video below and you can purchase it here.

via swissmiss

Chameleon Cabin: White Arkitekter

14 Jan

Chameleon Cabin, White Architects, Sweden, reversible paper cabin, white marble from one side, black marble opposite sideChameleon Cabin, White Architects, Sweden, reversible paper cabin, white marble from one side, black marble opposite sideChameleon Cabin, White Architects, Sweden, reversible paper cabin, white marble from one side, black marble opposite sideThe Scandinavia-based architecture firm White Arkitekter has created a tricky all-paper cabin titled Chameleon Cabin. Made of corrugated paper and weighing roughly 100 kilos, looks like white marble from one angle and black marble from the opposite one. Using a simple system of tabs and slots, 95 paper modules—printed in white on one side and black on the other—were attached to form a cabin the proportions of which were based on those of a Swedish friggebod, a shed that can be built without planning permission. The modular system could be used to create longer structures as well. The bright yellow interior is a great glowing touch.

Photos by Rasmus Norlander

via designboom

3D Printed Prosthetics: Bespoke Innovations

9 Jan

3D printed Prosthetic fairings by Bespoke Innovations, Scott Summit. Design, Industrial design3D printed Prosthetic fairings by Bespoke Innovations, Scott Summit. Design, Industrial design3D printed Prosthetic fairings by Bespoke Innovations, Scott Summit. Design, Industrial designThe three of us have been fascinated by 3D printing since we first saw a demo a few years back, and the fascination keeps growing as the possibilities keep expanding. Sure, we’ve seen all kinds of jewelry, housewares, sculptures, even a bikini, but these prosthetic fairings (coverings that surround an existing prosthetic leg) are lovely pieces of design serving a decorative as well as personalizing function. Industrial designer Scott Summit joined forces with orthopedic surgeon Kenneth Trauner, MD and founded Bespoke Innovations with the mission of bringing more humanity to people who have suffered the loss of a limb. The process and design are individualized by using 3D scanning technology to capture images of a person’s sound leg as well as their prosthetic one. The wearer is given their body symmetry back by superimposing the sound leg shape onto the prosthetic one. Customization of the Fairing is overseen by the user who can pick and choose materials and patterns to achieve a personalized result. It’s all so smart and impressive.

via formfiftyfive

Hello Wood: 365-Sled Christmas Tree

13 Dec
Christmas Tree made with 365 Sleds (sleighs) by Hello Wood in Budapest, HungaryChristmas Tree made with 365 Sleds (sleighs) by Hello Wood in Budapest, HungaryChristmas Tree made with 365 Sleds (sleighs) by Hello Wood in Budapest, HungaryClick to enlarge

Imagine 365 wooden sleds stacked in the form of a Christmas tree. Now imagine each of those sleds going to a child in need once the structure is dismantled. Nice, right? Well, that’s just what architecture/design studio Hello Wood (previously here) is doing at the Palace of Arts in Budapest. In the span of one week, they built an 11-meter tall tree that can be viewed from inside as well, giving the impression of being in the middle of a giant snowflake. The base is made of steel to keep things safe in case of strong winter winds. A tall wooden frame was built with the help of a crane and some welding, in which the sleds were fixed upon. Once the temporary installation comes down, Hello Wood will donate the sleds to the children at SOS Children’s Villages, keeping things reusable and charitable as the holidays should be.

Here’s a video of the installation process:

Photos: Daniel Dömölky

via architect

12 Shoes for 12 Lovers: Errazuiz

9 Dec
12 Shoes for 12 Lovers by Sebastian Errazuriz, fun shoe designs for Basel Miami 2013,  cool shoes, splash shoes, crybaby12 Shoes for 12 Lovers by Sebastian Errazuriz, fun shoe designs for Basel Miami 2013,  cool shoes, jetsetter12 Shoes for 12 Lovers by Sebastian Errazuriz, fun shoe designs for Basel Miami 2013,  cool shoesClick to enlarge

NYC-based Chilean designer Sebastian Errazuriz (previously here and here) enjoys playing with the offbeat and wacky in his designs while pushing boundaries. His latest project, currently on exhibit at Miami Basel, is titled 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers. Consisting of twelve shoe sculptures, each representing the memory of twelve previous relationships, the project is an attempt to go through the reminiscence of former lovers who are the inspiration for each Shoe Sculpture. The shoes are accompanied by photos and stories in which Errazuriz reveals a glimpse of each relationship and in the process exposes himself to scrutiny and judgment.  Some sculpture titles include: Cry Baby, Jetsetter, Gold Digger, The Virgin, GI Jane, and the Rock. You can see the rest of the set over here.

via core77

Coloso: DOMA Collective

5 Dec
Coloso, giant robot-shaped electrical tower in Buenos Aires by Doma Collective for TecnopolisColoso, giant robot-shaped electrical tower in Buenos Aires by Doma Collective for TecnopolisColoso, giant robot-shaped electrical tower in Buenos Aires by Doma Collective for TecnopolisClick to enlarge

I’ve seen electrical towers disguised as unconvincing trees, but a colossal robot might be the more fun way to go. That’s just what Buenos Aires art collective Doma did for the Tecnopolis, a science and technology art fair in Villa Martelli, Argentina. The converted power tower was aptly named Coloso and its glowing neon hands, heart, and animated face add to the fun of the almost 148 ft tall artistic intervention. The luminous robot puts on quite a show at night highlighting its winking eyes and growing heart. Watch it in action below:

via graffitimundo

Gingerbread & Candy Art Museums

2 Dec
Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Louvre, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinClick to enlarge

Sure, it’s that time of year when visions of sugar plums dance in your head, and gingerbread houses abound. But New Zealand-born artist/photographer Henry Hargreaves based in Brooklyn and stylist/chef Caitlin Levin took their holiday creations to new heights. The two have collaborated on several projects in the past (Deep Fried Gadgets being a largely recognizable one,) but their latest collaboration took the form of Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums & Galleries for ArtBasel/Miami. These amazing models of the iconic institutions were made using gingerbread, hard candy, chocolate, licorice, and many other tasty sweets. Hargreaves and Levin made tabletop-size replicas of the Louvre, Guggenheim, Maxxi, Tate Modern, Karuizawa Gallery, MAS, and Soumaya and then cleverly lit and photographed each one.

You can see more of the process here.

via grit and neatorama

Moving Icon: Kalhöfer-Korschildgen

27 Nov
Moving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryMoving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryMoving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryClick to enlarge

Moving Icon is a mobile pop-up pavilion designed by Cologne-based Kalhöfer-Korschildgen that travels around the Westphalian region of Germany providing its visitors with information on local architectural history. The compact house-like mini-museum attaches to the back of a car and, with the click of a remote control, literally ‘pops’ open transforming into a lovely illuminated pavilion. The exhibit includes both analogue and digital displays and incorporates typography into its structure and signage in a clever and designy manner. The display is interactive and can be customized for any location.

Photos by Jörg Hempel

Sam Falls: Tuileries Colored Sculpture

21 Nov
Tuileries Colored Sculpture, Sam Falls, Untitled, Hors les murs, Balic Hertling Gallery  Tuileries Colored Sculpture, Sam Falls, Untitled, Hors les murs, Balic Hertling Gallery  Tuileries Colored Sculpture, Sam Falls, Untitled, Hors les murs, Balic Hertling Gallery  Click to enlarge

Los Angeles artist Sam Falls created an Untitled sculpture for Hors les Murs, a public art event in Paris, made up of colored metal boxes. The exterior of these multi-color windowed pieces was coated in a UV-protected pigment. The inside of the same boxes were treated with an unprotected paint. Though each respective panel appears to be the same color on both sides, the sides facing inwards will all fade in the sun. The form that each sculpture takes is dictated by the shadows that fall on the inside of the sculpture and the gradient of sunlight is revealed over time, burned into the sculpture like a photograph. Unlike most outdoor sculptures usually designed to stand the test of time as well as the elements, Falls’ Untitled (Tuileries Colored Sculpture) is meant to age the way we do. But, there’s a final twist! Once the interior panels fade through their top coat, the bottom coat from the exterior will start to emerge, reversing the aging effect, and revealing the bright saturated color once again. Not so much what we as humans go through, though maybe if we exfoliate enough….

Photos: Courtesy Balice Hertling (Paris) et Eva Presenhuber (Zürich); FdN77′s twitter; Miami Herald; le banc moussu; and dalbera’s flickr.

via fiac

Net Blow-Up Yokohama: Numen/For Use

8 Nov
Numen/For Use, inflatable net blow-up in Yokohama, for playNumen/For Use, inflatable net blow-up in Yokohama, for playNumen/For Use, inflatable net blow-up in Yokohama, for playClick to enlarge

The Numen/For Use (previously here and here) guys are at it again. Known for their fun, playful, interactive structures, the Croatian-Austrian collective has recently gone inflatable. Their latest installation in Yokohama (home of the also fun CupNoodles Museum) looks like a carnival Moonwalk gone wild. The stylized cloud-like object has nets inside connected to its inner lining that expand and become taut as the blob is blown up. The exterior membrane is sheer enough that when lit from within, it acts as a projection screen for the activity inside. The nets provide climbing and tumbling surfaces on multiple levels. Looks like a blast.

via vizkultura via notcot

Lauren Tickle Jewelry: Increasing Value

7 Nov
Lauren Vanessa Tickle, Jewelry made with US Currency, brooches & necklaces made with money, Increasing Value Lauren Vanessa Tickle, Jewelry made with US Currency, brooches & necklaces made with money, Increasing ValueLauren Vanessa Tickle, Jewelry made with US Currency, brooches & necklaces made with money, Increasing ValueClick to enlarge

Dan and Em attended the RISD Entrepreneur Mindshare conference in Providence, RI a couple of weeks back and, among the many interesting presentations, they saw artist/jewelry designer Lauren Tickle speak about her work.

The Brooklyn-based RISD Alum has a series of jewelry pieces under the title Increasing Value. In these brooches, necklaces & earrings, Tickle takes US currency of a designated value and cuts it apart, then pieces these delicate and ornate elements together creating a new object of greater value: jewelry. This experiment questioning value, adornment, and materialism is meant to make the wearer reflect on these social constructs in today’s society.

A couple of Tickle’s works, such as the $16.50 Necklace which sells for 100x its original currency value, can be purchased at the MoMA Design Store.

All photos courtesy of the artist.
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