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Shadi Ghadirian: Like Every Day

2 Jun

Shadi Ghadirian, Contemporary Iranian Photography, Like Every Day, Women and domesticity, role in societyShadi Ghadirian, Contemporary Iranian Photography, Like Every Day, Women and domesticity, role in societyShadi Ghadirian, Contemporary Iranian Photography, Like Every Day, Women and domesticity, role in societyShadi Ghadirian, Contemporary Iranian Photography, Qadar, Women and domesticity, role in societyIranian photographer Shadi Ghadirian lives and works in Tehran. Her photographs, though at first glance somewhat humorous, reflect what she sees as “the duality and contradiction of life.” After her marriage, inspired by her wedding gifts, Ghadirian photographed her series Like Every Day in which each of these photographs depicts a figure draped in patterned fabric in place of the typical Iranian chador. Instead of a face, each figure has a common household item such as an iron, a tea cup, a broom, or a pan, depicting the daily routine of many of the women that surround her yet, despite its focus on Muslim women, its relevance extends to women in other parts of the world as well. An earlier series titled Qajar (bottom two photos) is equally smart, reimagining the traditional Iranian portraiture of the late 19th century, but the veiled women carry boomboxes and other modern-day items.

via tribeart

Henk van Rensbergen: Abandoned Places

23 Apr

Photographs of abandoned places by Henk van Rensbergen, abandoned dental officePhotographs of abandoned places by Henk van Rensbergen, abandoned house and stairsPhotographs of abandoned places by Henk van Rensbergen, abandoned homes, offices, amusement parks, hair salonBelieve it or not, Belgium-born Henk van Rensbergen is an airline pilot; a job which takes him to many locations around the world. But it is the urge to explore eerie abandoned sites which he’s possessed since childhood, that has led him to take this stunning series of photographs (and books) titled Abandoned Places. Van Rensbergen captures the ghost-like atmosphere that exists within these spaces, whether they be homes, offices, amusement parks or hair salons. The presence of those who once inhabited these locations is almost palpable. The stories (or the stories we decide to create in our minds) are there to be told via his amazing images. These few are just the tip of the iceberg. You can see so many more over here. I think it’s safe to say, flying might be Mr. Rensbergen’s official profession, but photography is clearly his passion.

via umbrella

Bodyscapes: Carl Warner

1 Apr

Bodyscapes, photos of landscapes made with bodies, by Carl Warner, contemporary photographyBodyscapes, photos of landscapes made with bodies, by Carl Warner, contemporary photographyBodyscapes, photos of landscapes made with bodies, by Carl Warner, contemporary photographyAfter years of great success in advertising in the 80s and 90s, British photographer Carl Warner suddenly found his work less in demand and not as fulfilling creatively. Searching for something to rekindle his interest in photography as well as put some new energy into his flagging business, Warner started creating Foodscapes having found inspiration in the produce section of his supermarket. After going viral, these foodscapes opened the door to new clients and a burst of work. From the foodscapes, Warner then departed to a series of other scapes including these Bodyscapes. Maybe a tad disturbing, these contorted and manipulated bodies certainly do make some fantastic landscapes. And the titles fit perfectly. A few examples: The Cave of Abdo-men; Cut Throat Valley; and Headless Horizon, just to name a few. You can see more of these Bodyscapes and the rest of Carl Warner’s work over here.

via behance

Alyse Emdur: Prison Landscapes

25 Mar

Prison Landscapes by Alyse Emdur, The Last Brucennial, photography, prisonsPrison Landscapes by Alyse Emdur, The Last Brucennial, photography, prisonsPrison Landscapes by Alyse Emdur, The Last Brucennial, photography, prisonsDan and I went to The Last Brucennial this past weekend and in the midst of the fun chaos that is the show, we spotted some work that really stood out for us. Among these were two large photos by Alyse Emdur which elicited several emotions at once: confusion; laughter; and sadness. And that was before I even googled the artist to find out more about these! We assumed the artist had placed the bizarre murals in these depressing office spaces/institutions, but as it turns out, they all truly exist in this manner. Prison Landscapes as the series, as well as book, is called, is a collection of photographs of prison waiting rooms, that typically have backdrops—often painted by the inmates themselves—which are used as portrait set-ups for the inmates and their visitors to pose in front of for photos. These idealized landscapes offer a brief escape…a chance to pretend that they are somewhere else. Emdur invited hundreds of prisoners to send in their photos for inclusion in her book Prison Landscapes which was initially inspired by a photograph she found in 2005 of herself at age five, posing in front of a tropical beach scene while visiting her brother in prison. Poignant and at the same time a little unintentionally humorous.

Street Artist Portraits: Guille Lasarte

7 Mar

Street Artist Portraits, Guille Lasarte, photos ofprojected street art onto artistsStreet Artist Portraits, Guille Lasarte, photos of projected street art onto artistsStreet Artist Portraits, Guille Lasarte, photos of projected street art onto artistsI like this concept: projecting street artists’ work onto them and photographing their portraits is what photographer Guille Lasarte did here. Street artists in this series include members of Demolition Crew, Jos, Duarte Brito from Unimotion, Mr. Isaac, Hugo Ferracci, and Cintia Lopes. Another concept I like: Book a Street Artist.

Both via Panta

Shelley Jackson: Snow Story

14 Feb

Shelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycShelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycShelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycIt’s been, and continues to be, a long and relentlessly snowy winter here in NYC this year, but Brooklyn-based author/illustrator Shelley Jackson is making the best of it. With admirable handwriting, Jackson has set out to writing a story in the snow—one word at a time—photographing each one and posting them to her instagram. Reading from oldest photo to newest, you can follow the ongoing story, waiting with bated breath for the next words to appear. Photos, it seems, are posted in relatively large batches roughly once a week, so maybe you can get a sentence or two in at a time. Story aside, the photos themselves are lovely, with great composition and a splash of color here and there. This is not the first time Shelley Jackson has taken to story-telling a word at a time; SKIN, a story published in tattoos on the skin of 2,095(!) volunteers is a previous project.

You can follow SNOW (in reverse order) over here, “weather permitting”, but from the looks of things outside, that shouldn’t be an issue…this could end up being a multi-volume story.

via gothamist via the awl

Fred Cray: Unique Photographs

13 Feb

Fred Cray, Unique Photographs, photos by the artist hidden all around the world to surprise. Janet Borden Gallery, Changing of the GuardFred Cray, Unique Photographs, photos by the artist hidden all around the world to surprise. Janet Borden Gallery, Changing of the GuardFred Cray, Unique Photographs, photos by the artist hidden all around the world to surprise. Janet Borden Gallery, Changing of the GuardPhotographer Fred Cray’s (previously here and here) latest exhibit at Janet Borden Gallery centers around his ongoing work titled Unique Photographs. It’s a fun idea that engages the public, distributing his unique artworks in the most unexpected places. But, really, who better to describe it than the photographer himself?

“This project is referred to as Unique Photographs which is also the title of the first overview book about the project. The second book, Changing the Guard, is a counter point to the first book and uses the same image double printed to make hundreds of unique print variations. The photographs have been hidden literally around the world with the intent of surprising people in pleasant ways, perhaps being kept as gifts. This should be an on-going project taking on new permutations for a number of years. The photographs have been stamped and numbered with holes being punched in the photographs recently to reinforce the notion of the photographs being unique objects.”

You have until February 21st to see the show at Janet Borden. Additionally, you can purchase both books here and here. And keep your eyes peeled for Fred’s unique photographs around your neighborhood. You never know where the next one might pop up…

Jon Burgerman: Head Shots

30 Jan

Head shots by Jon Burgerman, a series of photographs staged in front of violent movie ads and spewing bloodHead shots by Jon Burgerman, a series of photographs staged in front of violent movie ads and spewing bloodHeadshots by Jon Burgerman, a series of photographs staged in front of violent movie ads and spewing bloodThe always-wacky usually-less-bloody Jon Burgerman (previously here) has a an ongoing series of interventions staged in front of film and television ad panels, photographing himself perfectly situated as the target of the pointed gun, arrow, or other weapon of choice in each poster. These Head Shots, as the series is called, are then digitally manipulated, adding splattered blood in a Tarantinoesque fashion. Definitely a departure from the cute characters he usually draws, but still, somehow, very Burgerman.

You might like his Korean Subway series, too.

FlipBooKit Moto

15 Jan

FlipBooKit Moto by WEndy Marvel & Mark Rosen, Kinteic ArtistsFlipBooKit Moto by WEndy Marvel & Mark Rosen, Kinteic ArtistsFlipBooKit Moto by WEndy Marvel & Mark Rosen, Kinteic ArtistsWho doesn’t like a good flipbook, right? And your very own? Even better. A few years back I made a couple of flipbooks of my kids when they were little via flipclips which were a hit, but now kinetic artists Wendy Marvel and Mark Rosen have taken the concept to a whole new level with their FlipBooKit Moto, a motorized animated flip book. Based on their own artworks inspired by the motion studies of Eadweard Muybridge, the duo applied the same techniques they use in their sculptural mechanical flipbooks to a DIY kit. It’s easy to assemble— you’ll only need a screwdriver—and will take less than an hour to complete. You can use the included art or use your own images, the possibilities are limitless! Looks like a great gift idea. You can hear more about it in the video below and you can purchase it here.

via swissmiss

Audra Hubbell: Letters at Large

20 Dec
Letters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyLetters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyLetters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyClick to enlarge

I love everything about Chicago-based designer Audra Hubbell‘s project Letters at Large. For starters, it’s type. Large type at that. Then the combination with architecture and the effect of each on the other is pretty fabulous. Somewhat reminiscent of Jenny Holzer’s Projections, but here it’s all about the one letter as opposed to text. Hubbell unleashes full-scale typography in public spaces as a visual research project exploring the interaction between projected large scale letterforms and the urban Chicago surroundings. Wouldn’t it be great if the poster set were available for purchase.

via behance

Janice Lee Kelly: Balloon Sculptures

18 Dec
Janice Lee Kelly, Balloon Sculptures, Float, RISD alum, balloon installations and sculpturesJanice Lee Kelly, Balloon Sculptures, Float, RISD alum, balloon installations and sculpturesJanice Lee Kelly, Balloon Sculptures, Float, RISD alum, balloon installations and sculpturesClick to enlarge

Initially inspired by working with balloons in her retail business, architect/photographer/entrepreneur Janice Lee Kelly (originally from Kentucky) began developing the medium into her own personal art form, eventually creating her studio FLOAT. Creating gravity-defying, kinetic and ethereal sculptures, Kelly captures and records their interaction with the environment through photography and video. In addition, Kelly creates balloon pieces and installations for exhibits and event spaces that range from smaller private ones to Lincoln Center for the Big Apple Circus.

via risdxyz

George Ferrandi: It Felt Like I Knew You…

11 Dec
George Ferrandi, It Felt Like I Knew You..., performance art, photography, street art intervention, Subway performance artGeorge Ferrandi, It Felt Like I Knew You..., performance art, photography, street art intervention, Subway performance artGeorge Ferrandi, It Felt Like I Knew You..., performance art, photography, street art intervention, Subway performance artClick to enlarge

For some, regularly dozing in moving vehicles and inadvertently leaning against random strangers while doing so, is a common occurrence (ahem…Em), but in the case of Brooklyn-based artist George Ferrandi, it’s completely intentional. For her ongoing project It Felt Like I Knew You Ferrandi rides the subway (her choice for these interventions because of its packed quality and the loneliness one can feel despite the physical intimacy) during rush hour and tests the limits of this shared confined area by reshaping the space between her body and a stranger’s sitting next to her.

I focus on the shape of the space between the person sitting next to me and myself. I attempt to mentally and emotionally re-sculpt that space. In my mind, I reshape it- from the stiff and guarded space between strangers to the soft and yielding space between friends. I direct all my energy to this space between us. When the space palpably changes, and I completely feel like the stranger sitting next to me is my friend, I rest my head on that person’s shoulder…

Ferrandi started the continuing project in 2012. The endearingly humorous results are documented by co-conspirator Angela Gilland on her phone. So, the next time you feel a woman’s head rest on your shoulder in the subway, it’s likely to be George Ferrandi…or, Em.

It Felt Like I Knew You can be seen at the Abrons Arts Center as part of the exhibit GUTS through the end of December.

via abrons arts center

Gingerbread & Candy Art Museums

2 Dec
Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Louvre, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinClick to enlarge

Sure, it’s that time of year when visions of sugar plums dance in your head, and gingerbread houses abound. But New Zealand-born artist/photographer Henry Hargreaves based in Brooklyn and stylist/chef Caitlin Levin took their holiday creations to new heights. The two have collaborated on several projects in the past (Deep Fried Gadgets being a largely recognizable one,) but their latest collaboration took the form of Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums & Galleries for ArtBasel/Miami. These amazing models of the iconic institutions were made using gingerbread, hard candy, chocolate, licorice, and many other tasty sweets. Hargreaves and Levin made tabletop-size replicas of the Louvre, Guggenheim, Maxxi, Tate Modern, Karuizawa Gallery, MAS, and Soumaya and then cleverly lit and photographed each one.

You can see more of the process here.

via grit and neatorama

Benjamin Løzninger: C/Loud Project

26 Nov
Cloud Project by Benjamin Løzninger, street art, head in the clouds, photography, France, BrooklynCloud Project by Benjamin Løzninger, street art, head in the clouds, photography, France, BrooklynCloud Project by Benjamin Løzninger, street art, head in the clouds, photography, France, BrooklynClick to enlarge

French-born, and now Brooklyn-based, artist/designer/musician Benjamin Løzninger likes to merge digital storytelling with experimental branding. This past summer Løzninger’s C/Loud Project took to the streets of Paris and Brooklyn. With the idea of seeking refuge from some of life’s daily worries or the “dull bluntness of ocular reiteration,” the artist covered the sides of buildings, garage doors, billboards and more, with large digital prints of cloud-filled blue skies, subliminally suggesting a head-in-the-clouds effect. The hope is to provoke a smile, breath, or at a minimum a moment’s pause in the viewer’s day.

via musée

Lucas Simões: Desretratos

19 Nov

Desretratos by Lucas Simoes; Unportraits. !0 cut and layered photo portraits, Contemporary Brazilian artDesretratos by Lucas Simoes; Unportraits. !0 cut and layered photo portraits, Contemporary Brazilian artDesretratos by Lucas Simoes; Unportraits. !0 cut and layered photo portraits, Contemporary Brazilian art Click to enlarge

Brazilian artist Lucas Simões uses source materials such as maps, books, and photographs which he then folds, cuts, and deconstructs into new forms. In his series of portraits titled Desretatos (Disportraits) Simões invited friends to tell him a secret as he took their portrait. More than listen to the secret, Simões was interested in capturing their expression as they revealed it. He would also listen to a song selected by the subject as he photographed them, and asked them to give their secret a color as well. Combining all these elements as he worked, the artist would then select 10 different portraits from the photo shoot, layer them, cut, and overlap them. As you can see, the results are pretty wild. See more Desretratos here.

via fifty8

Ross Sawyers: Dismantled Rooms

25 Oct
Ross Sawyers, Cool Photographs of dismantled homes, homes and walls with cracks and lightRoss Sawyers, Cool Photographs of dismantled homes, homes and walls with cracks and lightRoss Sawyers, Cool Photographs of dismantled homes, homes and walls with cracks and lightClick to enlarge

Photographer Ross Sawyers builds models of construction-site-like homes and photographs them as full-scale eerie environments. Sawyer is interested in the home and the relationships we have with our own. His most recent photos contain drawings and markings on the walls of the spaces which are related to hobo signs—a language that was developed during the Depression by transients to inform each other about neighborhoods, houses and people. Sawyer states in an interview with the Seattle Met:

…one of the things that led me to it was when foreclosures were really commonplace in maybe 2009 or 2010. A lot of people, as they were foreclosed on, would just destroy the house—whether that was through vandalism or just pure destruction—and so that got me interested in the kinds of marks and destructive actions people were inflicting upon the spaces. Through research on that, I sort of stumbled across information about hobo signs. And the relationship between those two things became really interesting to me.

Some of them have a magical feel, no? Love them.

via seattlemet

Luis Gispert: Photos of Logo-clad Car Interiors

23 Oct
Luis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyLuis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyLuis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyClick to enlarge

Brooklyn-based artist/photographer Luis Gispert stumbled upon a culture of fashion-label customized car interiors that would be hard not to call impressive. These luxury brand knockoffs, or ‘interpretations’ according to Gispert, are created with the same obsession, fantasy, and dedication as an artist creates his/her art. Gispert’s series of photographs of these status-seeking automobiles (mostly owned by people of modest incomes who in many cases spent much more on the customization than the actual value of the final product) was compiled as a show titled “Decepción” at Mary Boone Gallery. From an Escalade covered in Murakami “LV” prints, to Stephen Sprouse’s bright green graffitti-scribbled version; a Burberry-lined Volkswagen to a pink Coach covered car; all artworks of sorts in their own right. The perfectly paired vistas from the windshields, however, are separate landscape photographs taken by Gispert and perfectly matched to emphasize the extremes between natural beauty and the questionable taste of our consumerist society.

You can see more of Gispert’s work on his website.

via musée

#Encaja_dos: Lagaleriademagdalena

22 Oct
Lagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridClick to enlarge

Las Magdalenas of Lagaleriademagdalena (previously here) have been at it again. Actually, they never stop. About a year ago the duo set up a pop-up photocall intervention titled Encaja_dos (meaning ‘to fit’ and read ‘within box’) where guests’ heads and torsos were photographed, well, within a box. These were placed on the walls of an empty lot in El Born, a section in the old part of Barcelona. Its popularity was such, that slowly over the year the lot had additions made to it, with gravel and seating added, becoming one of the most photographed corners of the city and recently included in official city tours. But Encaja_dos is no longer exclusive to Barcelona. Last month Las Magdalenas moved its next iteration to Rivas Vaciamadrid as part of the Cultural Festival in the Streets of Rivas. Taking new portraits of locals in white boxes, they then, with the assistance of many volunteers and friends, entered the waters clad in fisherman boots and pasted the photos along the white walls of the park, giving the impression of windows overlooking the banks. Add to that the reflective effect of the water, and the result is quite different from the original lot in El Born.

Keep an eye on these ladies. They are in full-steam-ahead mode, with new ideas and pop-ups every month. I wouldn’t be surprised if their work extended past the streets of Spain shortly.

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