Swing Time: Höweler + Yoon Architecture

Swing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightSwing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightSwing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightIt’s a cool glow-in-the-dark playground. No, it’s an art installation. Well, actually, husband-and-wife team Eric Höweler + Meejin Yoon of the Boston-based Höweler + Yoon Architecture were striving for both. The temporary installation titled Swing Time, located in a public park space next to the Boston Convention Center in South Boston, consists of 20 glowing oval swings that encase LED lights which activate with the swings’ movement. When forces are static and the swings are not in use, they emit a soft, white light that illuminates the area. When the swings are in motion, the micro-controller switches the light from white to purple, creating a more colorful glowing effect. Swing Time is part of an initiative to create the first interactive public space in the city, with the goal to entice people of all ages to play. If you’re in Boston, you might want to check it out.

via urdesign via notcot

Mana Contemporary

Mana Contemporary art galleries, open studios, Richard Meier Model Museum, Gary Lichtenstein Editions Print shop, Glass Gallery, in Jersey City, NJ. Industrial space convererted into art galleries and artist studiosMana Contemporary art galleries, open studios, Richard Meier Model Museum, Gary Lichtenstein Editions Print shop, Glass Gallery, in Jersey City, NJ. Industrial space convererted into art galleries and artist studiosMana Contemporary art galleries, open studios, Richard Meier Model Museum, Gary Lichtenstein Editions Print shop, Glass Gallery, in Jersey City, NJ. Industrial space convererted into art galleries and artist studiosMana Contemporary art galleries, open studios, Richard Meier Model Museum, Gary Lichtenstein Editions Print shop, Glass Gallery, in Jersey City, NJ. Industrial space convererted into art galleries and artist studiosYou wouldn’t necessarily associate Moishe’s Moving with art and architecture, but you would be wrong not to. Moishe Mana, founder of the moving company, and his right-hand man Eugene Lemay have converted 150,000 square feet of the 1.5 million industrial space they own in Jersey City into the impressive Mana Contemporary, a center that houses over 250 artists’ studios, numerous art galleries, Richard Meier’s Model Museum, Gary Lichtenstein’s Editions printing studio and shop, in addition to dance studios, an art book shop, a bistro, designer studios, a recently completed spectacular column-free 50,000-square-foot separate glass gallery, and who knows what else? I visited last spring during an open studios event and was blown away by the facilities as well as the quality of the art (there are some impressive names on the doors such as Michal Rovner and others.) The Richard Meier Model Museum is a must-see, and there are special exhibits in many of the art galleries. The trip from NYC is relatively quick on the Path train but, as was the case when I visited in May, this Sunday, September 14th there will be free shuttle buses running from the Meatpacking District every half hour, making the excursion irresistible.

Photos: collabcubed and mana

Richard Wright: Aird’s Lane Installation

Richard Wright, Modern Institute, Aird's Lane glass skylight installationRichard Wright, Modern Institute, Aird's Lane glass skylight installationRichard Wright, Modern Institute, Aird's Lane glass skylight installationGlasgow-based artist Richard Wright creates impermanent site-specific interventions that engage in temporality and the built environment. His latest, closing this Saturday for The Modern Institute in Glasgow, consists of four leaded glass skylights in the ceiling at Aird’s Lane. Wright incorporated handmade, blown glass and leading in an intricate design placed within four existing rectangular skylights resulting in a dramatic—almost three dimensional—effect within the room. The textured glass interferes with the natural light reflecting it and causing a shift in the viewer’s perspective. Much in the way Wright’s paintings are of a transient nature, so are the patterns on the walls and floors created by the light through these complex glass pieces.

The exhibit will be up through 9/6/14. Catch it if you can.

 

Big Maze: Bjarke Ingels Group

Big Maze, Bjarke Ingels Group, BIG, in National Building Museum, WAshington DC, Labyrinth, cool art installationBig Maze, Bjarke Ingels Group, BIG, in National Building Museum, WAshington DC, Labyrinth, cool art installationBig Maze, Bjarke Ingels Group, BIG, in National Building Museum, WAshington DC, Labyrinth, cool art installationThis looks fun and since we’ll be attending festivities in Maryland this weekend, maybe we’ll be able to squeeze in a quick jaunt to the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. before the maze comes tumbling (well, maybe not tumbling) down on Monday, September 1, 2014. Danish architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) (previously here and here) has created a concave wooden labyrinth in the middle of the museum’s main hall. Constructed with maple plywood, the structure rewards your efforts by revealing a 360-degree view of the maze once you reach the center, the point where the 18 ft tall walls are clearly a lot shorter. Of course, there’s always the option to get a different—and more complete— perspective/view from the second and third floor balconies without doing all the work, but then, what fun would that be?

via wallpaper

Land of the Giants: Choi+Shine

Land of the Giants, Choi+Shine Architects, Electrical Pylons in shape of giant men and women, Iceland, CompetitionLand of the Giants, Choi+Shine Architects, Electrical Pylons in shape of giant men and women, Iceland, CompetitionLand of the Giants, Choi+Shine Architects, Electrical Pylons in shape of giant men and women, Iceland, Competition

Can’t say that any electrical pylons I’ve seen are particularly attractive with all those cables protruding from their metallic structures, but at least this design by Jin Choi and Thomas Shine of Choi+Shine Architects in Boston injects a little humor and personality into these massive forms. Known for their innovative and creative designs and experimentation, Choi+Shine submitted a proposal for a High-Voltage Pylon competition in Iceland—put forth by Landsnet, a national power transmission company requesting that careful consideration be given to the appearance of the towers—converting the existing steel-framed tower designs into iconic pylon-figures with minor alterations. The result would transform the Icelandic landscape, adding expression and fun, varying the forms and styles while keeping the cost low through repetition in production and simple assembly. These 150 foot tall giants across the land would silently transport electricity 24/7. Might be a little creepy coming across them on the road at night, but a fun alternative to the norm, nonetheless.

Thanks, Ramon!

The Water Tank Project: Word Above the Street

The Water Tank Project, Word Above the Street, Mary Jordan, 100 water tanks in nyc wrapped in artists's works to raise environmental awareness. NYC. Art and awarenessThe Water Tank Project, Word Above the Street, Mary Jordan, 100 water tanks in nyc wrapped in artists's works to raise environmental awareness. NYC. Art and awarenessThe Water Tank Project, Word Above the Street, Mary Jordan, 100 water tanks in nyc wrapped in artists's works to raise environmental awareness. NYC. Art and awarenessThe Water Tank Project, Word Above the Street, Mary Jordan, 100 water tanks in nyc wrapped in artists's works to raise environmental awareness. NYC. Art and awarenessLook up New York! The Water Tank Project has started to roll out…or maybe “wrap around” would be more accurate. I first learned of Word Above the Street’s project roughly one year ago, but was happy to hear yesterday, via an interview on wnyc, that this is actually taking place right now. Filmmaker Mary Jordan, the creative and driving force behind the project, was working on a documentary in Ethiopia in 2007 when she fell gravely ill due to contaminated water. It was the women in the village she was in who nursed her back to health. In return, they asked that she let people know of the global water crisis when she returned to the U.S. Jordan founded Word Above the Street and set out to fulfill her promise through a citywide exhibit on the very icons that proudly contain our own fortunate and excellent water supply. Over 100 water tanks will be wrapped with art by acclaimed artists (such as John Baldessari, Jeff Koons, Maya Lin, Andy Goldsworthy), street artists (including Icy & Sot, Barry McGee, and Fab 5 Freddy), emerging artists, and even NYC public school students. The first one, by Laurie Simmons (top photo), went up two weeks ago on 29th Street near the High Line, and another one (I couldn’t find the artist, but third photo down) on West 25th Street.

Tanks in all five boroughs will be included and, in addition to the art above, action will be taken on the ground through educational programs, tours, and a symposium dedicated to global water issues. So, keep your head up and eyes peeled for the next 3 months if in NYC. Or, if not, you can always follow them on twitter or instagram for the latest updates. Water above all!

Photos & images courtesy of The Water Tank Project

Flederhaus: House of Hammocks

House of Hammocks, Hammock House, Vienna, Flederhaus, Heri & Salli ArchitectsHouse of Hammocks, Hammock House, Vienna, Flederhaus, Heri & Salli ArchitectsHouse of Hammocks, Hammock House, Vienna, Flederhaus, Heri & Salli ArchitectsThe Flederhaus—a pun off the word fledermaus which means ‘bat’ in German—is a fun structure in Vienna designed by architects Heri & Salli explicitly for hanging around and relaxing. The open building, situated in the Museum Quarter of the city, houses 28 hammocks on 5 floors that offer great views to one and all at no cost. The inviting hammocks are arranged to allow for meeting and interacting with neighbors. A fun public space for sure.

Photos by Mischa Erben courtesy of the architects.