Leeds Street Tree Grates: HeineJones

Typographic Tree Grates in Melbourne, Australia, designed by HeineJones, SEGD Merit 2012Typographic Tree Grates in Melbourne, Australia, designed by HeineJones, SEGD Merit 2012Typography, cool tree grates, environmental graphics, Melbourne, Australia, Typography in architectureClick to enlarge

HeineJones, an interdisciplinary design consultancy based in Melbourne, was approached by the city council of Footscray to design an interpretive solution describing the function and intent of a new “rain garden” installed as part of a streetscape redevelopment for Leeds Street. HeineJones’ solution presented the function and intent of a water garden as a piece of poetry, laser cut though the 10mm steel plate of the tree grates. Presented in different scales and languages, the urban poems include large words that form abstract snippets of information about the rain garden, with the poem in its entirety reproduced in smaller type.

The intent of the design is to engage the public in an emotive and legible way, whereby the passage and movement of the water into the system is through the information itself.

via segd

CupNoodles Museum

Cup Noodles Museum, fun, interactive museum in Yokohama, Japan, make your own cup noodles, factory, park, museum, history, momofuku andoCup Noodles Museum, fun, interactive museum in Yokohama, Japan, make your own cup noodles, factory, park, museum, history, momofuku andoCup Noodles Museum, fun, interactive museum in Yokohama, Japan, make your own cup noodles, factory, park, museum, history, momofuku andoCup Noodles Museum, fun, interactive museum in Yokohama, Japan, make your own cup noodles, factory, park, museum, history, momofuku andoClick to enlarge

Just back a few days from their amazing trip to Japan, Em and Dan had lots to report. High on their list in terms of cool fun was the CupNoodles Museum in Yokohama, about 30 minutes from Tokyo. Opened last fall, the interactive museum chronicles the history of the instant ramen noodle created by Momofuku Ando in 1958. Included in the museum is a Design-your-Own Cup Noodle from content to package design, a replica of the shed where the instant ramen was invented, A Noodles Bazaar Food Court, and a theme park. Oh, and of course, a gift shop selling all things ramen, including the lovely set of chopsticks that they brought back for me, which I might just have to frame instead of actually use. When I questioned the relevance of the fun graphic logo, Em and Dan immediately responded with “No, it’s perfect. That’s exactly the feeling you experience the minute you step through the door.” ’Nough said.

Update: I just noticed that the exclamation points refer to the decorative border on the CupNoodle cup, so there’s that too…

All photos by collabcubed except second from top and second from bottom by Yuriko Nakao/Reuters.

Jon Burgerman

Jon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, tribute to Maurice Sendak and MCA, Beastie BoysJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, Bushwick Band, Anxieteam, Bushwick DreamClick to enlarge

I attended the Reasons to be Creative conference last week here in NYC and was blown away by every single speaker. Such talent! Creativity! Passion! Truly amazing.

One of the more entertaining speakers — due to his charm and wackiness — was Jon Burgerman, a British expat living and working in Brooklyn, in addition to eating a lot of salad and pizza. An illustrator and street artist, Burgerman draws and paints colorful characters that have been made into Kidrobot toys, appeared on Pepsi cans, hats, sneakers and even a car or two. He is (as described on his website) “a multidisciplinarian carefully constructing a world in which the narrative of being an artist is played out across a wide variety of media for the distraction, enlightenment and delight of those who choose to tune in.” Also, a total goofball, in the best sense of the word.

He recently had a show in a pizza shop in New Jersey; walls filled with pizza slice characters on paper plates (I am now the proud owner of ‘Cheesus Slice’). His tribute to the recently passed Maurice Sendak and Beastie Boys’ MCA is perfect. And if all these projects aren’t enough, he performs with fellow artist and good friend Jim Avignon as Anxieteam, which, to me, has a low-budget Flight of the Conchords feel and looks like it would be a lot of fun to witness live.

Oh, Plastiksack!

Plastic bag exhibit at the Gewerbemuseum in Switzerland, cool art installations, paintings, product design all made with plastic bagsPlastic bag exhibit at the Gewerbemuseum in Switzerland, cool art installations, paintings, product design all made with plastic bagsSimon Monk, paintings of superheroes in plastic bags, Oh Plastik Sack exhibit,Plastic bag exhibit, art installations, products, photographs, made with plastic bagsClick to enlarge

Oh, Plastiksack! is an exhibition currently at the Gewerbemuseum in Switzerland. A tribute to, and a commentary on, the ubiquitous plastic bag; from trash to status symbol, as well as a reflection of consumption patterns, the plastic bag is represented as the medium of choice and running theme for all the sculptures, installations, paintings, products and photographs in the show.

From top to bottom, left to right:
Luzinterruptus
(lit dumpster); Simon Monk (Batman and Robin in plastic bags paintings); Ida-Marie Corell (Ikea bag installation and dress); Duty Free bag collection (artist?); Claudia Borgna (plastic bag installation in courtyard); Living room furniture made from plastic bags by Anne-Cecile Rappa, Biaugust and Ryan Frank; Luke Julius Keijser (tailored suits); and Nils Völker (plastic bag installation Eighty Eight).

The exhibit runs through June 21, 2012.

Photos: Gewerbemuseum, Claudia Borgna, Ida-Marie Corell, Bernhard Hageman; Tommi Makynen.

Thanks, Nils Völker!

I Have/I Need: Sarah Crowley & Charlotte Fliegner

Interactive installation, swapping services via chalk speech bubbles, Collaborative consumptionInteractive installation, swapping services via chalk speech bubbles, Collaborative consumptionInteractive installation, swapping services via chalk speech bubbles, Collaborative consumptionClick to enlarge

Melbourne architects Sarah Crowley (previously here and here) and Charlotte Fliegner have designed a community sharing project called I Have I Need. Using speech bubble-shaped chalkboards, they have created a series of installations where the community can write down goods or services they have to offer, or items they need along with contact details.

Through this sustainability initiative, people area able to recycle their waste, share services they can offer, and take what they may need. Through sharing, people are encouraged to meet, interact and thus create a sense of community.
The project has been installed in several locations around Melbourne, where it has generated vibrant street life and a passion for sharing amongst neighbours. We are excited by the informal public spaces that form around these boards, turning blank walls into neighbourhood spaces for engagement.

Crowley and Fliegner are currently looking for more wall space to install their project around Melbourne. If you have some to offer or suggest, get in touch with them here.

This project is a perfect example of collaborative consumption!

Thank you, Sarah.

Reasons to be Creative: June 14-15 NYC

design conference in NYC 2012 with speakers including Paula Scher, John Maeda, James Victore, Jer Thorpdesign conference in NYC 2012 with speakers including Paula Scher, John Maeda, James Victore, Jer Thorp, previously Geeky by NatureIf you’re in NYC and interested in design and technology this might be for you. Dan and I went to this conference last year, which was previously called Geeky by Nature (see here and here) and now renamed Reasons to be Creative. It was great. Two full days of amazing speakers, all doing incredible work and very passionate about it. There were even interesting things going on in the lobby during breaks, like a MakerBot demonstration from one of its creators.

From their website:
Reasons to be Creative is a festival for creative artists, designers and coders. The festival brings together some of the most respected and brilliant minds from the worlds of art, code, design and education to share their passion, knowledge, insights and work. Expect two days packed with talks, networking, inspiration and learning.

Speakers this year include John Maeda, Paula Scher, James Victore, Jer Thorp and many, many more. I wish I had posted this earlier when tickets were less expensive, but it’s still quite reasonable for this kind of conference, plus Student Tickets are just $99 for two days of events! Maybe I’ll see you there…

See the Reasons to be Creative website for details.

Eltono: This Way in Warsaw

Social street art project in warsaw with French/Spanish artist Eltono, Otone, Vlepvnet, GPAScommunity street art project in warsaw with French/Spanish artist Eltono, Otone, Vlepvnet, GPASSocial street art project in warsaw with French/Spanish artist Eltono, Otone, Vlepvnet, GPASClick to enlarge

I love these kinds of projects. Originally French but living in Spain, street artist Eltono (‘the tone’) collaborated on a mural, last month, with kids from Mala Street in Warsaw as part of the project “This Way” implemented by the Vlepvnet Foundation and the GPAS. The kids involved in the project are ones who, because of their social environment, don’t have easy lives and spend much of their time on the street. With their help, a geometric abstract alphabet was created and words using those letters and selected by the kids were painted on a wall on Mala Street. From defining the letters to cutting stencils and spray-painting the words, the kids worked with Eltono every step of the way, taking pride in their art.

I wasn’t able to translate the wall but for those who want to give it a shot here is the alphabet and a Polish to English translator.
(Using the virtual keyboard and pressing the “Alt+Ctrl” key you will be able to use the Polish special characters.) If anyone figures it out, please share with the rest of us!

If you like this project, you might also enjoy Boa Mistura’s work.

via escrito en la pared

Typographied Objects IV

typography on mugs, numbers on mugs, typographic objects, bold numbers, fun itemsTypography on floor of Romanian National Library, Type Installation, Typography in ArchitectureTypography on objects from food to housewares and clothes. Letters, Type, Numbers, typographied objectsClick to enlarge

It’s been a while but here is the latest roundup of typography objects.

From left to right, starting at the top working down
Number Mugs from SuckUK; Floor of the Romanian National Library: Typographic Chessboard; Type Tote (front and back); Vitamin Packaging; Proposed Milk Carton Packaging; Sascha Grewe Letter Stools; Full House by J. Mayer H. for Bisazza SPA with dataprotection patterns; Handwritten Typeface by Lucas Neumann de Antonio; Edible Gelatin Type; Quotation Mark Plate; Typographic Sliding Puzzles; Bathroom Signage Student Project by Daniyil Onufrishyn; Alphatots Potatoes; TarGetBooks Shelf by Mebrure Oral; Dynamo Typocolate; Linus Dean Rugs; Typographic Dress; Urban Dinnerware; Love Your Fellow As Yourself T-shirt; Pablo Lehmann Bookcase; Ouch Quote Quips Bandages; and Anita Shelving by Ricard Mollon

See our previous posts Typographied Objects I, II, and III.

Tapewriter: Autobahn

Autobahn design studio, Tapewriter, Duct Tape font, Typeface, Street Art typographyAutobahn design studio, Tapewriter, Duct Tape font, Typeface, Street Art typographyAutobahn design studio, Tapewriter, Duct Tape font, Typeface, Street Art typographyClick to enlarge

Dutch design studio Autobahn, founded by Maarten Dullemeijer and Rob Stolte, created the font Tapewriter while experimenting using duct tape as the writing material and outdoor metal fencing as their canvas. Each rectangle in the fence matched the width of the duct tape, creating a kind of bitmapped effect when words were taped out on the metal grid. From street art and free expression to font…interesting.

via behance

Henrik Vibskov: Book Launch Performance

Henrik Vibskov, performance art, cool installations, graphic stage sets, avant garde fashion designHenrik Vibskov, performance art, cool installations, graphic stage sets, avant garde fashion designHenrik Vibskov, performance art, cool installations, graphic stage sets, avant garde fashion shows, avant garde art installations, wacky, fun, car washClick to enlarge

Danish fashion designer Henrik Vibskov is not your ordinary fashion designer. His fashion designs could be described as avant garde, but they are only the tip of the iceberg. He is a multifaceted artist, stage designer and musician who has a unique, sort of wacky, offbeat style. Seeing one of his fashion shows must be a real treat. More of a performance art piece than a classic runway show.

This month a book of his work is due out titled, not surprisingly, Henrik Vibskov. For the Berlin book launch, Vibskov designed and choreographed an interesting performance with a graphic backdrop and two actors covered in the same pattern, performing odd tasks, such as sweeping into a dustpan, in very slow motion. Also not to be missed are his collaborations with Andreas Emenius, including The Fringe Projects and The Circular Series.

You can watch a video of the book launch performance below.

And here is one of the installations from The Fringe Projects pictured above, titled Car Wash in action:

via gestalten

Designboom Mart 2012 Designs

designboom mart 2012 at ICFF products/designs, frames, stools, bowls, bagsdesignboom mart 2012 at ICFF products/designs, Teevstyle airplane window frames, stools, Bold and Lovely porcelain bowlsAfter two days at the designboom mart 2012 at ICFF, things are going really well at our table with lots of nice feedback, but we’ve also had the pleasure of being surrounded by so many interesting, clever, and beautifully designed products. Here are some of our immediate neighbors whose designs we’ve been admiring.

Above top, Seoul-based design studio TEEV has designed these very clever picture frames in the style of an airplane window. No, the window shade does not come down, despite many a person’s attempt at pulling, but even without that possibly-in-the-future fun feature, these frames put a smile on most everyone’s face.

Right below the photo frames, Nancy Froehlich’s Bold & Lovely chunky porcelain bowls with bright and colorful glazed interiors, are simply beautiful. Contemporary and fresh in their design, we’re still trying to decide which one of these bowls from Oregon we’re going to purchase for ourselves. Nancy also has a line of plates with quote marks on them that have been quite popular at the show.

recycled bottle caps into shoulder bags, squashed basketball fruitbowls, R. Mutt toilet stickers, Marcel DuchampA couple of tables over, Colombian design studio Proyecto Tres y Medio have brought along their Tápate messenger bags made of recycled plastic bottle caps that have been sewn together and lined to make a series of very unique bags.

UK-based Alex Garnett has an interesting collection of work that includes ceramic fruit bowls in the shape of squashed basketballs and, Daniela’s favorite (though she got there two minutes after the last one at the mart was sold): Conceptual Crap –“R. Mutt” stickers to transform your toilet into a Duchampian/DADA work of art. Brilliant!

Beautiful woodwork, Dadelion stool and magazine rack, amazing packaging for beautiful ring designsMoissue from Taiwan has some spectacular woodwork. Their Dandelion stool — which doubles as a magazine rack — is beautifully crafted and would make a great sculpture on its own let alone a dual-purpose piece of furniture. Their wood and metal rings are lovely, but what really blew us away is their incredibly innovative packaging; a wooden cylinder that screws shut with the ring inside. Without a doubt the best jewelry packaging I’ve ever seen.

There are  plenty more creative products at the designboom mart and we’ll also be sharing some designs from ICFF 2012 as well in the coming days.

Yeah! More FarmGroup

Fun Type Installation made with drinking straws, in Bangkok mall, Yeah!, collabcubedFun Type Installation made with drinking straws, in Bangkok mall, Yeah!, collabcubedFun Type Installation made with drinking straws, in Bangkok mall, Yeah!, collabcubedClick to enlarge

Bangkok-based multi-disciplinary design studio FarmGroup (previously here) created this fun Christmas installation at the Siam Center. Using thousands of colorful plastic drinking straws, the sculpted the word “Yeah!” along with several shapes of animals, stars, and other holiday motifs.

If you like this you might also like Sang Sik Hong’s Straw Sculptures and Scott Jarvie’s Clutch Project, also made with straws.

Multipraktik: TapeArt

Street art from Slovenia, Murals made with colored tape, graphic designers, multipraktikStreet art from Slovenia, Murals made with colored tape, graphic designers, multipraktikStreet art from Slovenia, Murals made with colored tape, graphic designers, multipraktikClick to enlarge

The Slovenian, multi-disciplinary, design collective Multipraktik organized a series of street TapeArt actions – with different artists across Slovenia – as part of the new campaign for Orto, a cellphone carrier company. Aside from the resulting wonderful murals, it looks like these guys had a lot of fun. Take a look at one of the many stop-motion videos below.

via urban pride

Kay Rosen: Wordplay

Typographic Installations, Words, Type as art, Kay Rosen, play with wordsTypographic Installations, Words, Type as art, Kay Rosen, play with wordsTypographic Installations, Words, Type as art, Kay Rosen, play with wordsThese are fun. Texas-born artist Kay Rosen, who teaches at SAIC in Chicago, loves type. The shapes. “They are the architecture of text.” Her typographic art installations are playful and fun to figure out, but just to make it a little less challenging, I’ll list the titles from top to bottom here:

Blurred
Deep Beep
Wideep
Tent
Pendulum
MañanaMan
Overbite
Go Do Good

Many more on her website!

via IdN

Guillermo Álvarez Charvel & Héctor Falcón

Book art, Book sculptures, Héctor Falcón Guillermo-Alvarez Charvel esto-(no)-es-un-libro-de-artistaBook art, Book sculptures, Héctor Falcón Guillermo-Alvarez Charvel esto-(no)-es-un-libro-de-artistaClick to enlarge

Just ending this past weekend at the MACG (Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil) in Mexico City, was an exhibit titled Esto (no) es un libro de artista (This is (not) an artist book) which included the book sculpture works of Guillermo Álvarez Charvel and Héctor Falcón. Yes, the amount of art revolving around books these days is both overwhelming and a little depressing, but at least these soon-to-be-extinct objects will live on as sculpture and installations.

It’s interesting to see both these artists side by side and, in some cases, collaborating. While Álavarez Charvel uses paper folding to create his book sculptures and works up from the original volume, Falcón’s works are more topographic, where he will stack books but then cut them into pieces or carve into them.

via espacio blanco

Boa Mistura: Order is Intangible

Typographic installation, Boa Mistura, Louis Kahn Poem, cool type installation, collabcubedTypographic installation, Boa Mistura, Louis Kahn Poem, cool type installation, collabcubedTypographic installation, Boa Mistura, Louis Kahn Poem, cool type installation, collabcubedThe Spanish art collective Boa Mistura (previously here) composed of five self-proclaimed ‘graffiti rockers’ created this cool anamorphic typography installation for the interior design fair Interiorissimo Decoracción 2011. Inspired by the poem “Order is” by Louis I. Khan, the words “El Orden es Intangible” (Order is intangible) were painted on an abstract furniture composition that is only legible from one specific angle. This sort of thing always blows my mind.