T. J. Wilcox: In the Air at the Whitney

In the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumClick to enlarge

Currently, the second floor of the Whitney Museum is largely taken up by New York-based artist T. J. Wilcox‘s dramatic 360˚ panoramic film installation titled “In the Air”. The giant circular screen measuring roughly 7 feet high and 35 feet in diameter projects the span of a day in the city, from dawn to dusk, sped up to run in a 30-minute cycle. Inspired by the views from the roof of the building where he has his studio in Union Square, Wilcox filmed, or actually shot 60,000 stills, shot at the rate of one per second, and seamlessly patched together. Superimposed on this vista are six short films that loop, each with a NYC connection. From a documentary/portrait of the Empire State Building to Warhol inflating his silver helium balloons on the roof of his Factory, to Wilcox’s super recounting his personal witnessing of September 11 from that very roof.

I’m looking forward to seeing this exhibit soon—with my newly gifted membership—but, more interestingly, here is Wilcox speaking a bit on the work:

“In the Air” will be up at the Whitney through February 9, 2014.

Top photo by Fred R. Conrad for the NY Times; second photo courtesy of the Whitney; bottom three photos by Clare Henry.

Ole Martin Lund Bø: Anamorphic Type

Ole Martin Lund Bø, Anamorphic Typography Sculpture, Deceptive Outward AppearanceOle Martin Lund Bø, Anamorphic Typography Sculpture, Deceptive Outward AppearanceOle Martin Lund Bø, Anamorphic Typography Sculpture, Deceptive Outward AppearanceClick to enlarge

Finnish artist Ole Martin Lund Bø‘s wooden installation Deceptive Outward Appearance uses the technique of anamorphosis as we’ve seen also here and here. Even having seen other works utilizing the similar effect, I’m still always impressed at the ability to create these, as well as interested in the individual components that make up the whole. It’s just that one specific spot in the room that makes the words/image come into focus and go from gibberish, or abstraction, to a specific and clear message. Kind of the way I feel when I put on my reading glasses…

All images courtesy of the artist.

via étapes

Ark Nova: Inflatable Concert Hall

Lucerne Festival, Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki collaboration, inflatable concert hall Ark NovaLucerne Festival, Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki collaboration, inflatable concert hall Ark NovaLucerne Festival, Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki collaboration, inflatable concert hall Ark NovaClick to enlarge

A little over a year ago I posted about a project in the works called Ark Nova, an inflatable, mobile, concert hall, and now, suddenly, it’s a reality. A beautiful one at that. I suppose it’s not surprising when two extremely talented creative professionals—in this case artist Anish Kapoor and architect Arata Isozaki—collaborate along with the Lucerne Festival. This unique structure made of purple parachute material inflates in approximately two hours and seats 500. Starting October 14th, the theater will open to the public hosting concerts and other events around the tsunami-stricken areas of Japan.

Photos courtesy of the Lucerne Festival.

via colossal

Disco Volante: Lukas Galehr

Disco ball pizza oven at Disco Volante in Austria by Lukas Galehr. Cool pizza oven.Disco ball pizza oven at Disco Volante in Vienna by Lukas Galehr. Cool pizza oven.Disco ball pizza oven at Disco Volante in Vienna by Lukas Galehr. Cool pizza oven.Click to enlarge

Austrian architect Lukas Galehr  (also part of the design collective Madame Mohr) designed the Viennese pizzeria Disco Volante including its centerpiece: a unique oversized rotating disco ball oven that glitters against the walls in the dark. Covered in hundreds of tiny mirrored tiles, the spherical pizza oven is positioned within the dining room and is anchored to a central chimney that allows it to pivot from its center. Here it is in action:

via dezeen

Empire Drive-In: NY Hall of Science

Empire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventClick to enlarge

Lately, each consecutive summer in NYC seems to top the last in offerings of outdoor film screenings. Locations range from parks, to restaurant backyards, to rooftops and even beaches. And now, the concept is extending into the fall with an additional twist: a drive-in. Not just your usual run-of-the-mill drive-in, which in itself would be cool and intriguing enough, but Empire Drive-In is a junk car drive-in, upcycling wrecked cars rescued from junkyards and repurposing them as seats for audience members to climb into, and onto, while watching films projected on a 40-foot screen made of salvaged wood. The masterminds behind the project—which will be held outside the New York Hall of Science in Corona Park, Queens, starting October 4th and running though the 20th—are Jeff Stark (whose name seems to be associated with many an interesting NYC event) and Todd Chandler. The two Brooklyn-based artists have previously created other Empire Drive-Ins, most recently last year at the Abandon Normal Devices Festival in Manchester, UK. Stark and Chandler, along with a team of other artists and craftspeople have set out, in this age of consumerism, to create a sense of possibility  by focusing on re-use, designing something new and special while salvaging and repurposing waste. In cleaning up the cars, which will have stereo audio transmitted via radio directly to each car, the crew found all kinds of interesting personal artifacts from car deodorizers to letters, which they have chosen to keep in the cars to “create a story”. The audience is urged to explore.

Opening night promises to be fun with a 30-Pianists-on-Casio-keyboards performance, in addition to a stellar line-up of films from Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, and Oliver Hardy, to Jim Jarmusch’s Night On Earth. You can see the rest of the schedule here.

All photos & video courtesy of Empire Drive-In

via gothamist

Machine Home: AdHoc MSL

Machine Home by adhoc msl, murcia, spain, david frutos photographer, Machine Home by adhoc msl, murcia, spain, david frutos photographer, Machine Home by adhoc msl, murcia, spainClick to enlarge

The Machine Home  in Murcia, Spain, designed by adhoc ml, can be described as a cross between the traditional dwelling and the caravan. It is easily transportable and can be put up anywhere. All it needs is a minimal foundation and a connection to MEP installations, be these existing urban services or mechanisms making for the module’s total self-sufficiency: potable and irrigation water, plumbing and purifying systems, telecommunications lines and energy-capturing devices.

The Machine Home has three main parts. The central area is for shared household activities. One of the side spaces contains the sanitary utilities on ground level and the other installations above. The other lateral space is a double-height storeroom. The central room has an overhead hole that the inhabitants climb up to, by means of two ladders, to get to the bedrooms.

Once anchored to the ground, the module proceeds to colonize the place and interact with it through a series of added elements constructed on the site: a pergola, a terrace deck, an outdoor kitchen, a pond. They bring the interior domestic space to the exterior environment by means of a double hydraulic door system that helps reinforce the disturbing machine image of the house.

Photos courtesy the architects and David Frutos.

Heart of the District: ZA Architects

Heart of the District by German ZA Architects, cool hotel design, Cut 'n' Paste exhibit MoMA, futuristic architectureHeart of the District by German ZA Architects, cool hotel design, Cut 'n' Paste exhibit MoMA, futuristic architectureHeart of the District by German ZA Architects, cool hotel design, Cut 'n' Paste exhibit MoMA, futuristic architectureClick to enlarge

A few weeks ago while taking in several exhibits at MoMA, we came upon a very interesting image as part of a digital slideshow in the architecture Cut ‘n’ Paste exhibit. After running through all the captions on the wall, we finally found what was unmistakably the corresponding one, clued in by the vital organ referenced: Heart of the District by ZA Architects. The Germany-based architecture firm came in second place in an international competition with their futuristic heart-shaped pod-like structure. Their proposal, for a hotel in NYC, integrates the street, the city dwellers, as well as the hotel guests, giving the tourist a more inside experience on their visit. The hotel rooms would reside in the existing adjacent buildings with the heart shape construction acting as a hub to draw people in and mix, acquaint them inside its tight spaces, while they partake in varied activities. The “heart’ itself would contain a playground, shop, exhibition space, café, bar, hotel reception, lounge zone, small cinema, library, conference hall. And, it goes without saying, whether you like it or not, the structure would likely become a NY icon.

All images courtesy of the architects.

Barbara Kruger: Belief+Doubt

Barbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtClick to enlarge

As part of an initiative to bring art to new sites within and around the Hirshhorn Museum, roughly a year ago the museum installed Barbara Kruger’s Belief+Doubt exhibit to fill the Lower Level lobby and extend into the newly relocated bookstore. The supersized words that have increasingly become Kruger’s trademark, create an environment that surrounds the viewer with language. The walls, floors, and escalators are all wrapped in text-printed vinyl that address themes of consumerism and power. I love when type takes over a space and choosing a highly-trafficked area that includes so many different angles with the stairs is particularly dramatic. The exhibit will continue through December 2014, so if you find yourself in Washington D.C. in the next year and a half, you might want to stop by the Hirshhorn to have a look in person.

Here it is being installed:

Photos by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the artist.

via juxtapozed

Matthew Mazzotta: Open House

Open House, Matthew Mazzotta, Coleman Center for the Arts, Recycled House from private space to public Open House, Matthew Mazzotta, Coleman Center for the Arts, Recycled House from private space to public Open House, Matthew Mazzotta, Coleman Center for the Arts, Recycled House from private space to public Click to enlarge

Artist Matthew Mazzotta (previously here) teamed up with Coleman Center for the Arts and the folks of York Alabama to transform one of the town’s most blighted properties into a new public space. Using the materials of an abandoned house as well as the land it stood on, Mazzotta created one of his shape-shifting structures titled Open House. Starting in the shape of a house, the puzzle-like structure is designed to require cooperation. Four people must work together for over an hour to unfold the pieces into a multi-seat theater that can be used for performances or simply a common ground for community dialogue and activities. Everything about this project is ultra-clever and well designed: its construction (and deconstruction); the repurposing of materials; as well as the community-building aspect via the integration of the townspeople. Here’s a video with more background on the project:

Thanks Matthew!

Cloudscapes: Tetsuo Kondo & Transsolar

Tetsuo Kondo, Transsolar, Cloudscapes, cool installations with contained cloudlike formations, contemporary art, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Venice BiennaleTetsuo Kondo, Transsolar, Cloudscapes, cool installations with contained cloudlike formations, contemporary art, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Venice BiennaleTetsuo Kondo, Transsolar, Cloudscapes, cool installations with contained cloudlike formations, contemporary art, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, Venice BiennaleClick to enlarge

Ever wish you could walk through a cloud? Japanese architecture studio Tetsuo Kondo Architects and environmental engineers Transsolar, create Cloudscapes where visitors can experience a real cloud from below, within, and above. First, three years ago at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2010 their cloud installation floated within the center of the Arsenal and, more recently they exhibited a Cloudscape encased inside a transparent two-storey cube at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT). These installations are formed by pumping three layers of air into a contained space: cold air at the bottom; hot humid air in the middle; and hot dry air at the top. The pathways offered to visitors exploring the Cloudscape includes a staircase allowing them to experience the cloud from all angles, including walking through it.

via idporn & mymodernmet

From the CollabCubed Archives

We’re taking a little summer blogging break this month. To keep you entertained, we’ve put together easy access links to some of our more popular posts in the past months but, of course, feel free to peruse instead by category using the drop-down menu in the right sidebar, or click on the ‘random post’ icon also in the sidebar. There’s always our facebook page, as well, with links to all of our posts. And for those of you in NYC, please check out our recently launched site Culture on the Cheap offering daily suggestions of free and cheap events in New York City.

Enjoy and we’ll be back in a few weeks!

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trafiq-budapest-typography-architecture_collabcubedFarmacia-Lordelo_collabcubedUnidisplay_Carsten-Nicolai_collabcubedMirador-del-Palmeral_collabcubedPenique-Productions_collabcubedFarshad_Mehdizadeh_Dayereh-Snack-Bar_collabcubedOlson_Gensler_collabcubedAnn_Hamilton_the-event-of-a-thread_collabcubedinfinity_bridge_Speirs-and-Major_collabcubedPendulumChoir_collabcubedStairway-Cinema_Oh.No.Sumo_Auckland_Australia_collabcubedAlex-Schweder_PerformanceArchitecture_collabcubedClearing-Installation_collabcubedAram-Bartholl_DVD-dead-drop_Museum-of-Moving-Image_2_collabcubedClip-Bag_Bristol_collabcubedREgeneration_CrackingArtGroup_collabcubedgeorge-orwell-birthday-party_surveillance-cams-party-hats_collabcubed

Paprika: Memory Gaps

Cool Interactive installation Trous des Memoires/Memory Gaps by Paprika in Montreal for Aires Libres, Aire Banque NationaleCool Interactive installation Trous des Memoires/Memory Gaps by Paprika in Montreal for Aires Libres, Aire Banque NationaleCool Interactive installation Trous des Memoires/Memory Gaps by Paprika in Montreal for Aires Libres, Aire Banque NationaleClick to enlarge

Montreal-based graphic design and strategic marketing firm Paprika (previously here) never disappoints. Checking in to their site for a boost of inspiration I came across their currently exhibited art installation for Aires Libres—an artistic event on St. Catherine Street in Montreal. Trous de mémoire (Memory Gaps) invites visitors to take a walk down memory lane, but there are tricks and humorous discoveries to be made, indicating that what is forgotten is not always lost. By day or by night, pedestrians can slip between the panels and uncover their secrets from up close or from a distance, deciphering them from all angles and even climb through them.

For those of us not near Montreal, the experience is nicely captured in the videos below, the second one being a timelapse version of the installation process (with a lovely song by Black Water.)

Memory Gaps (Trous de mémoire) is on view through September 2, 2013.

Voice Tunnel by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

NYC August Summer Streets, interactive art installations, Voice Tunnel, Rafael Lozano-HemmerNYC August Summer Streets, interactive art installations, Voice Tunnel, Rafael Lozano-HemmerNYC August Summer Streets, interactive art installations, Voice Tunnel, Coolstop Chat Travieso, The Course of Emotions, Risa PinoClick to enlarge

As part of this year’s Summer Streets in NYC — an annual celebration of the city’s most valuable public space: its streets! — for three consecutive Saturdays in August, nearly seven miles from the Brooklyn Bridge to Central Park are closed to traffic and opened for people to play, walk, bike, and enjoy. This year, as part of this event the Park Avenue Tunnel which runs from 33rd to 40th Streets, will be transformed into an interactive sound and light installation, Voice Tunnel, by Mexican artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (previously here and here.)  This rare opportunity to stroll the tunnel will invite participants to walk to a midpoint in the tunnel and deliver short messages into an intercom. The words/sounds will then reverberate out in waves of sound and arching light until they disappear. The intensity of the light will be determined by the pitch and volume of the person’s voice.

Voice Tunnel will be taken down after each of the three Saturdays before car traffic resumes, and will be set up again the following week. Other, smaller, interactive installations include Chat Travieso‘s CoolStop at Foley Square, a water mister that connects to fire hydrants made with recycled PVC piping. The 10′ installation resembles a large splash that participants will be able to stand under for a small reprieve from the heat. Also, The Course of Emotions: a mini-golf experience by Risa Puno, that translates everyday feelings into 9 holes of playable fun. Players putt through a range of emotional obstacles, like the seesaw platform of Insecurity and the par-40 Frustration maze.

Summer Streets will take place on the first three Saturdays of August (3rd, 10th & 17th) from 7am to 1pm.

Photos: Chang W. Lee/New York Times; & SummerStreets

Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY

Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedMarc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedMarc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedClick to enlarge

It’s hard to be in the vicinity of Parsons School of Design this summer and not be lured toward its exhibit window. The expression on the person’s face in the second photo is probably similar to the one I had when I crossed the street a couple of weeks ago, catching a glimpse of these striking floating structures from the corner of my eye. Turns out, these digitally sculpted dancers, titled Les Danseurs du Tailor, are the work of one of this year’s Architectural League Prize winners, Brooklyn-based Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY. Fornes is a leader in the development of computation applied to design and digital fabrication. He realizes geometrically complex and self-supporting structures for both artistic and commercial purposes, from pop-up stores (such as the Louis Vuitton Pop-up Store in London with Yayoi Kusama- 6th photo from top) to gallery installations and park pavilions. I don’t exactly understand the process, but Fornes digitally designs these skins—which are then produced either in carbon fiber, hand-riveted aluminum, or plastic—by analyzing and evaluating the algorithms and rules encoded in computational systems against the explicit forms, resulting in precise but unpredictable operations. Whatever the process, the results are show-stoppingly stunning.

Photos: Francois Lauginie; Guillaume Blanc; Stephane Muratet; and Moss Bureau

Image 3D: Custom View-Master Reels

Image 3D, Personal View-Master Reel builder, Personalized view-master reels, fun gift, promo ideaImage 3D, Personal View-Master Reel builder, Personalized view-master reels, fun gift, promo ideaImage 3D, Personal View-Master Reel builder, Personalized view-master reels, fun gift, promo ideaThis is such a fun gift idea! Make-your-own view-master reels. Want to share your vacation photos in a more unique way? Or maybe a bunch of shots of you and your significant other in one reel complete with view-master would make a nice birthday or Valentine’s gift. Or, for all you designers/artists/architects out there… what a fun way to promote your work to potential clients. The first set (one reel, one viewer, all in a glossy white box) is $30 and it goes down from there per piece if you order more. Founded by Rich Dubnow, lead photographer at View-Master for twenty years, Image3D clearly should be the masters of view-masters.

via bblinks

Noriko Yamaguchi: Peppermint Girl/Mother

noriko yamaguchi, yamaguchi noriko, peppermint girl, peppermint mother, photos of women immersed in gumsticks, claymation videonoriko yamaguchi, yamaguchi noriko, peppermint girl, peppermint mother, photos of women immersed in gumsticks, claymation videonoriko yamaguchi, yamaguchi noriko, peppermint girl, peppermint mother, photos of women immersed in gumsticks, claymation videoClick to enlarge

Japanese artist Noriko Yamaguchi works in video animation, photography, illustration and performance art. Her art, rigorous in its form and composition, stems from intimate experiences, thoughts, and references to personal memories and cultural encounters. It concentrates on the human body and its relation to nature, tradition, social environment and technology. In her photographs and claymation video titled Peppermint Girls and Peppermint Mother, Yamaguchi’s imaginary characters are creatures borne from chewing gum. Her video, below, shows numerous living gumsticks moving around and covering every part of Yamaguchi’s body. All her works are self-portraits with the idea of transmutation of the human body.

via artnet

Through Hollow Lands: Lilienthal|Zamora

Fluorescent tube art installation at Frye Art Museum, Seattle, by Lilienthal and ZamoraFluorescent tube art installation at Frye Art Museum, Seattle, by Lilienthal and ZamoraFluorescent tube art installation at Frye Art Museum, Seattle, by Lilienthal and ZamoraClick to enlarge

LILIENTHAL|ZAMORA is a collaboration between Etta Lilienthal and Ben Zamora, both performance designers who together have worked on many striking stage sets (I especially love last year’s Underbelly) as well as the labyrinthic installation Through Hollow Lands at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle. Made with 200 suspended fluorescent tubes, the bright and geometric piece has a great futuristic look to it. Beautiful.

Photos: Malcolm Smith courtesy Frye Art Museum except 4th photo down oieouio

via colossal

Monika Grzymala: Raumzeichnungen

Monika Gryzymala, tape installations, full gallery installations made with tape, RaumzeichnungenMonika Gryzymala, tape installations, full gallery installations made with tape, RaumzeichnungenMonika Gryzymala, tape installations, full gallery installations made with tape, Raumzeichnungengrzymala_hamburger-kunsthalleClick to enlarge

Poland-born, German artist Monika Grzymala creates large-scale tape installations that can be seen as three-dimensional drawings. The black tape constructions are site-specific taking over the their designated spaces, seemingly bursting from the walls, particularly in her series of works titled Raumzeichnungen (Drawing Room). Grzymala constantly pushes the boundaries of the line by creating drawings in space. Currently, Gryzymala has an exhibit at the Hamburger Kunsthalle, titled Mono Meros, (bottom photo) through August 28, 2013.

via ignant