Seth Wulsin: Animas

10 Jan
Animas, multi-screen installations, Seth Wulsin, Brooklyn artist, collabcubedAnimas, multi-screen installations, Seth Wulsin, Brooklyn artist, collabcubedSculpture, multi-screen, multi-dimensional heads, mesh sheets, Brooklyn artistSculpture, multi-screen, multi-dimensional heads, Buenos Aires street artSeth Wulsin, Installation, Buenos Aires Prison, Windows as pixels, cool art effectClick to enlarge

I saw one of Seth Wulsin’s Animas installations a few years ago in his studio as part of the Dumbo Arts Festival in Brooklyn. I was very impressed at seeing these large-scale screens hanging from the ceiling that individually just looked like plain screens, but when seen all together from the front, an almost holographic, three-dimensional, ghost-like head would appear floating on the screens.

Wulsin works primarily with space and light through these large-scale, site-specific, ephemeral sculptural installations. His Animas (soul in Latin) series explores the interior dimensions of mind and soul in the physicality of space. Here is how Wulsin describes his Animas sculptures:

Each sculpture has three kinds of inter-dimensional space that all occupy the same spatial coordinates: the concrete, volumetric space of the screens; the pictorial/volumetric space of the images produced by the paint on the screens; and the optical interference generated between the screen grids when two or more planes overlap (without coinciding) , an optically real, but tactically non-existent space.

Also very interesting are his works on the streets of Buenos Aires. The photo second from bottom, are two small Animas embedded in a building front, and the bottom photo is from his work 16 Tons, using the prison window grids of a Buenos Aires prison as a pixelated screen. By breaking out certain windows, images of faces appeared reflected in the remaining panes. Very cool and creepy.

2 Responses to “Seth Wulsin: Animas”

  1. Mark January 10, 2012 at 7:53 am #

    That’s savage!

  2. caseyctgcasey January 23, 2012 at 10:05 am #

    the faces idea on the windows is eerily similar to something I did in art school years ago.

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