NYC Culture on the Cheap: Weekend 7/13

Free and cheap things to do in New York City, New York City Summer 2012 Culture, Exhibits, art, music, Eleanor Friedberger, Kusama at Whitney, Shakespeare in Parking Lot, PS 1 Warm UpClick to enlarge

If you’re in New York City this summer weekend, there are more free and cheap things to do than time to do them. Here are just a few that look especially interesting to us…too bad we can’t be in more than one place at a time.

1. Art The Yayoi Kusama Retrospective opens at the Whitney Museum. Friday nights from 6-9pm admission is pay-what-you-wish, otherwise general admission is $18. Can’t make it this weekend? Don’t fret, the exhibit runs through September 30th. And if you’re downtown be sure to check out the lawn installation at Pier 45, Hudson River Park.

2. Art/FilmChristian Marclay’s The Clock opens July 13 through August 1 at the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE. Prepare for long lines. 24-hour video collage.

3. MusicEleanor Friedberger with Ex Cops. Friday, July 13th at 7pm; Pier 17 at The Seaport. FREE.
Also: for a more Latin evening: Calle 13/Ana Tijoux/Ritmo Machine at the Prospect Park Bandshell in Brooklyn. Friday, July 13 at 7pm. FREE.

4. TheaterShakespeare in the Park(ing) Lot – “The Merry Wives of Windsor” July 12 to 28. Municipal Parking Lot at the corner of Ludlow and Broome. Thursday – Saturdays at 8pm. FREE.
Also: Twelfth Night presented by New York Classical Theatre at Castle Clinton, Tues through Sun, till July 22th at 7pm. FREE.

5. Art/Architecture/MusicWarm Up at PS1, Saturday July 14 at 3pm with Terrence Parker, D3, Ron Morelli, Jeremie Delon, and Steve Summers. Check out Wendy, see Lara Favaretto’s exhibit Just Knocked Out, and dance the evening away. $15. Free for MoMA members.

6. Graphic DesignNow in Production is Cooper-Hewitt and Walker Art Center’s exciting exhibit exploring some of the most vibrant sectors and genres of graphic design today. Open weekends through September 3, 2012 in Building 110 on Governors Island. FREE.

7. ArtTomas Saraceno’s Cloud City on the roof of the Met. (See our previous post) Through November 4, 2012.

8. FoodPaper Magazine’s Super Duper Market. July 13-15. Pop-up super-store bringing the coolest food artisans and innovators under one roof. 410 West 16th Street, between 9th and 10th Avenues.

9. FilmPersepolis on Pier 1 (Riverside Park near 70th Street), Friday, July 13, 8:30-10:30pm. FREE.

And you might be interested in contributing to Bike-In-Theater’s Kickstarter so that they can get their events going this summer as well.

Jon Burgerman

Jon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, bright-colored charactersJon Burgerman, tribute to Maurice Sendak and MCA, Beastie BoysJon Burgerman, Street artist, illustrator, fun, humorous, goofy, Bushwick Band, Anxieteam, Bushwick DreamClick to enlarge

I attended the Reasons to be Creative conference last week here in NYC and was blown away by every single speaker. Such talent! Creativity! Passion! Truly amazing.

One of the more entertaining speakers — due to his charm and wackiness — was Jon Burgerman, a British expat living and working in Brooklyn, in addition to eating a lot of salad and pizza. An illustrator and street artist, Burgerman draws and paints colorful characters that have been made into Kidrobot toys, appeared on Pepsi cans, hats, sneakers and even a car or two. He is (as described on his website) “a multidisciplinarian carefully constructing a world in which the narrative of being an artist is played out across a wide variety of media for the distraction, enlightenment and delight of those who choose to tune in.” Also, a total goofball, in the best sense of the word.

He recently had a show in a pizza shop in New Jersey; walls filled with pizza slice characters on paper plates (I am now the proud owner of ‘Cheesus Slice’). His tribute to the recently passed Maurice Sendak and Beastie Boys’ MCA is perfect. And if all these projects aren’t enough, he performs with fellow artist and good friend Jim Avignon as Anxieteam, which, to me, has a low-budget Flight of the Conchords feel and looks like it would be a lot of fun to witness live.

Nuovo Teatro dell’Opera Firenze: ABDR

New Florence Opera House, ABDR architects, contemporary architecture in Italy, TravelNew Florence Opera House, ABDR architects, contemporary architecture in Italy, TravelNew Florence Opera House, ABDR architects, contemporary architecture in Italy, TravelClick to enlarge

Well, if Michelangelo’s David, Botticelli’s Venus or Tuscan cuisine wasn’t enough of a lure to get you to Florence, as of this past December there’s a new opera house, as well. Designed by the Italian architecture firm ABDR, il Nuovo Teatro dell’Opera di Firenze is only one of the projects included in a new music and cultural district linking the city with Cascine Park referred to as Parco della Musica.

The 1800-seat opera house also includes a smaller hall that seats 1100 and will be used for concerts and recitals. The design intertwines many outdoor terraces and spaces with the interior ones, using pathways to connect these areas. There is a 2000- seat open air facility as well. The large complex is decidedly modern with dramatic angles and curves, with a nocturnal glow caused by the dramatic lighting that shines through the woven exterior. The interior includes smooth geometric lines and warm wood panels.

via floornature

We Are Augustines

music, brooklyn band, rock, pop, chapel song, we are augustines

It’s been a while since we’ve posted about music, but I just heard this song (I may be late to the party on this) on the radio and really liked it. We Are Augustines are a Brooklyn-based band with their debut album titled Rise Ye Sunken Ships. I like everything about what I’ve heard and seen so far: both the music and the videos which show NYC in all its grungy beauty. The song above is Chapel Song and the video is by Matthew C. Mills.

via Soundcheck

Pharmacophore: Architectural Placebo

modern dance, inflatable sculpture, storefront for art and architecture, HAt, Silas Reinermodern dance, inflatable sculpture, storefront for art and architecture, HAt, Silas Reinermodern dance, inflatable sculpture, storefront for art and architecture, HAt, Silas ReinerClick to enlarge

Last night, the three of us strolled over to the Storefront for Art and Architecture here on Kenmare Street in NYC, to catch the last 20 minutes of the sold-out dance performance Pharmacophore: Architectural Placebo from the street. Storefront’s fun cut-out façade, which opens the small sliver of a space to the sidewalk, allowed us to enjoy the rather unique dance performance. A collaboration between designers Seth Harrison and Ariane Lourie Harrison of Harrison Atelier (HAt) and choreographer Silas Riener. The third installment in HAt’s Pharmacophore series, the performance, along with the installation, explore the cultural and philosophical economy that surrounds medicine technology and the human prospect in the 21st century.

From the creators:
The installation at Storefront, incorporating set and costumes, evokes a hybrid pharmaceutical-cultural landscape: both a medical waiting room with inflatable “plants” and a radiological suite in which the audience sits apposed to translucent glass. The installation consists of 24 eight-foot, laminated glass and stainless steel structures, arrayed along the back wall of the gallery. Contoured seats are dotted with inflatable forms that, when unfurled, become spatializations of pharmacophores. The inflatable set pieces are used as costumes and props, and audience members use them as cushions.

Truthfully, we did not see enough of the dance performance to justify an opinion, but what we did see, we liked. The Merce Cunningham dancers pranced, tumbled and gracefully walked with their fun inflatable tubular costumes that match the props and seat cushions in the beautifully glowing blue setting. We loved everything about the installation: the appropriately sterile pharmaceutical feeling evoked by the lighting and plastic inflatables; the clear Muji raincoats that acted as lab coats and were worn by staff; the seats with their mod-waiting-room feel; but most of all, the way it all worked so well together and successfully integrated with the space. And if that wasn’t enough, Baryshnikov was in the small audience!

Pharmacophore: Architectural Placebo will be performed twice a night through this Wednesday, November 30th. Tickets are free, but reservations necessary. And then there’s always the street view, too, if you want to use the stroll-by approach. The installation, sans performance, will continue on view through December 3rd.

For those who can’t attend, below is a short video of the previous performances in the Pharmacophore series:

Urban Daddy Cycling Classic

E2NY Festival, Urban Daddy, Cycling Classic, East Hampton, Interactive DesignE2NY Festival, Urban Daddy, Cycling Classic, East Hampton, Interactive DesignE2NY Festival, Urban Daddy, Cycling Classic, East Hampton, Interactive DesignThis looks like it must have been a lot of fun. As part of the E2NY Festival this summer in the Hamptons, Red Paper Heart – a collective of artists and coders who make music videos, installations and games by combining interactivity and animation –was asked to create an installation for UrbanDaddy. They proposed a head-to-head bike race with a design focus, mapping forests, foxbears and orbs to the speed of the bikes, giving the rider a sense of their speed. The rides lasted 60 seconds. The faster the cyclist the farther they got unlocking multiple environments. Some even made it to space.

Here’s a video worth checking out for a better sense of the event as well as the added treat of listening to a Collabcubed favorite: Ed Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros’ song “Home”.

I think they should implement something like this in my spin classes…

via TagoArtwork

Foster the People: Pumped Up Kicks

Music, Pop, Pumped Up Kicks, summer 2011

I’m figuring that this has been around for a bit, being that I just heard it nominated on NPR for best song of the summer, but it’s new to me. Foster the People is an LA band and, at least in this song (Pumped Up Kicks), they sound, to me, like a blend of MGMT and Peter, Bjorn & John down to the whistling segment. Very catchy. Very boppy. But if you listen to the lyrics, it’s not quite as lighthearted as it sounds.

OK Go + Pilobolus: All Is Not Lost

In the new video by OK Go (always a clever crowd-pleaser), “All Is Not Lost”, they teamed up with the modern dance troupe Pilobolus. There’s something for everyone: cool dance; kaleidoscopic effects; human typography…what’s not to like! If you’re a Chrome user, you can view the interactive HTML5 version here and type in your own message…which is, apparently, “way cooler.”

via Wired

Colored Vinyl Comeback

Colored Vinyl RecordsAfter a little googling, I discovered that colored records go back to some of the first records ever issued. In fact, the first wax records were yellow; I remember being fascinated by one that my mother owned when I was a child. Later, some 78s that were printed in multicolor swirls or splashes such as this one from 1923.

In the past ten years or so we’ve witnessed a resurgence of vinyl records, many of these seen as collectibles and possibly a good way for a small band to get visibility. Whatever the reason, I, for one, am enjoying their comeback from a design standpoint. Some of these artistically abstract colored vinyl records, from Brain Stowell’s flickr stream, are quite beautiful. More here.

via Graphic Exchange