Rune Olsen: Will to Power

Rune Olsen, Will to Power exhibit at La Mama Gallery, NYC. Cheese-Ball Head Paper Towel Holder, Humorous SculptureRune Olsen, Will to Power exhibit at La Mama Gallery, NYC. Endless Column, Tower of styrofoam takeout containers, Humorous SculptureRune Olsen, Will to Power exhibit at La Mama Gallery, NYC. Endless Column, Tower of styrofoam takeout containers, Humorous SculptureClick to enlarge

It’s hard to know what to make of the wacky exhibit Will to Power at La Mama Gallery here in NYC, but it’s definitely engaging. Norwegian artist Rune Olsen, now living in Hudson, NY, is interested in what he refers to as “Alternative Intelligences” such as ADHD, Asperger’s, Dyslexia and Bipolar disorder. He questions what functionality would look like if “the norm” were one of these alternative intelligences.

Using mostly food and kitchen-centric objects, Olsen creates pieces that include a Cheese-ball Head that conveniently doubles as a paper towel holder; a leaning tower of take-out containers titled Endless Column; a kitchen counter in the center of the gallery with a person covered in foil and dishes stacked precariously by the sink in a piece titled Endless Water Fall, just to name a few. The entire space has foam sausages flying through the air as well and, apparently, at times there are performances in the space, though not while I was there.

In some ways meme-like, the artist seems to favor that comparison. He speaks of the idea of evoking “a visceral response in the viewer, a response that elicits a desire to imitate thus initiating a first hand experience and making them personal.”

Will to Power will be up at La Mama La Galleria through November 17, 2013. Open Wednesday to Sunday 1 to 7:30pm.

Photos: collabcubed

Suzanne Caporael: Enough is Plenty

suzanne caporael, color paper collages, Enough is Plenty, Ameringer McEnery Yohe Gallerysuzanne caporael, color paper collages, Enough is Plenty, Ameringer McEnery Yohe Gallerysuzanne caporael, color paper collages, Enough is Plenty, Ameringer McEnery Yohe GalleryClick to enlarge

On the recommendation of a friend, I stopped by Ameringer McEnery Yohe Gallery last week to see NY artist Suzanne Caporael’s exhibit Enough is Plenty in the back of the gallery. Though the paintings were quite nice, the pieces I was immediately drawn to were the small color paper collages. The combination of her lovely palettes, the irregular shapes, and subtle hints of the New York Times newspaper in the background either in the form of folios and running heads, or articles ghosted back behind other paper, added a surprisingly lovely touch. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what makes these so special but, at least to me, they certainly were. Enough is Plenty will be up in the Chelsea gallery through November 23, 2013.

Photos courtesy Ameringer McEnery Yohe Gallery.

Misaki Kawai: Hair Show

Misaki Kawai, The Hair Show, fun, hairy sculptures with combs, childlike artMisaki Kawai, The Hair Show, fun, hairy sculptures with combs, childlike artMisaki Kawai, The Hair Show, The Hole Gallery, fun, hairy sculptures Click to enlarge

I stopped by The Hole gallery, here in NYC, the other evening right as they were closing, but I did get a chance to quickly peruse Japanese artist Misaki Kawai’s solo exhibit, Hair Show. And hairy it was. In fact, while I was there, there were three people sweeping hair off the floor throughout the gallery, while one gentleman mopped the very trampled and marked up white floor.

Kawai’s humorous, childlike hairy sculptures all come equipped with combs for creature grooming by visitors. The largest piece, Max, stands very tall and wide in the far room, and was apparently inspired by a dog Kawai sees daily on her block. Apart from the playful, geometric hairy creatures, the show also includes large minimalist charcoal canvases by the artist that capture the whimsy that children’s drawings often inhabit, yet somehow gets lost with age. Kawai seems able to genuinely recreate that elusive innocence. Not surprisingly, Misaki Kawai exhibited at The Children’s Museum last year. Her work would put a smile on people of all ages, even her large-boobed bench strategically positioned in the center of the gallery; an ideal vantage point for exhibit viewing.

Hair Show will be at The Hole through November 2, 2013.

Top photo courtesy of the artist. All others: collabcubed.

Animal Equality: Day without Meat

Animal Equality, Animal Rights Protest Barcelona, Day without Meat, street art, performance artAnimal Equality, Animal Rights Protest Barcelona, Day without Meat, street art, performance artAnimal Equality, Animal Rights Protest Barcelona, Day without Meat, street art, performance artClick to enlarge

Though it may not be exactly art or design, I think this animal rights protest in Barcelona would qualify as some sort of performance or street art. Animal rights activist group Animal Equality staged a demonstration that would give the most devoted omnivore, like myself, pause. For the International Day Without Meat back in March, demonstrators created giant supermarket-style meat packaging trays and had human models covered in fake blood and plastic sheets lie in them in front of the Cathedral of Barcelona. If that wasn’t eye-catching enough, large labels with barcodes and the words “Human Meat” or “Carne Humana” were added to the plastic coverings. I’d say their mission was accomplished in spades; artfully, peacefully, and powerfully.

via banoosh

Richard Dupont: Hanging Heads

Richard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureRichard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureRichard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureRichard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureClick to enlarge

You know you must really like an artist when two years apart, in two different locations, two different kinds of sculpture—though both heads—make you stop in awe. Today, walking by The Museum of Art and Design here in NYC, a came across a huge sculpture of what looked like a melting head. I checked inside with the museum people and the artist turned out to be Richard Dupont, whose work will be included in the show that opens October 16th titled Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital. Upon looking up Dupont’s work, I discovered that he is also the artist behind the large heads I saw, and was impressed by, a couple of years back in Chelsea filled with junk; albeit themed junk (see bottom photos). NYC born and based Dupont has been working with digital full-body scans of himself for over ten years. He likes to use technology as a tool, but is partial to the physical material over the information, preferring the results derived from “disrespecting” technology. His “Hanging Heads” as he calls them, were initially the result of an accident. Working on a foam enlargement of his head, he decided to paint it with rubber. Not happy with the outcome, Dupont peeled off the rubber coating, only to find that it came off in one piece, and then nailed it to the wall. Amazing. Can’t wait to stop by MAD to see more of Dupont’s work in person. Out of Hand will be up through July 6, 2014, so there’s time to get back there.

Top two photos: collabcubed. All other photos courtesy of the artist.

T. J. Wilcox: In the Air at the Whitney

In the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumClick to enlarge

Currently, the second floor of the Whitney Museum is largely taken up by New York-based artist T. J. Wilcox‘s dramatic 360˚ panoramic film installation titled “In the Air”. The giant circular screen measuring roughly 7 feet high and 35 feet in diameter projects the span of a day in the city, from dawn to dusk, sped up to run in a 30-minute cycle. Inspired by the views from the roof of the building where he has his studio in Union Square, Wilcox filmed, or actually shot 60,000 stills, shot at the rate of one per second, and seamlessly patched together. Superimposed on this vista are six short films that loop, each with a NYC connection. From a documentary/portrait of the Empire State Building to Warhol inflating his silver helium balloons on the roof of his Factory, to Wilcox’s super recounting his personal witnessing of September 11 from that very roof.

I’m looking forward to seeing this exhibit soon—with my newly gifted membership—but, more interestingly, here is Wilcox speaking a bit on the work:

“In the Air” will be up at the Whitney through February 9, 2014.

Top photo by Fred R. Conrad for the NY Times; second photo courtesy of the Whitney; bottom three photos by Clare Henry.

Tour Paris 13: The Paris Tower Project

Tour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceTour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceTour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceTour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceClick to enlarge

October has commenced and Street Art is in the air, or, more accurately on the walls. Here in NYC, Banksy has started stenciling the city with his Better Out Than In project, with possibly a work per day, with a phone number you can call to get an in-depth tongue-in-cheek guided tour to each piece.

Meanwhile, in Paris, Tour Paris 13 (Paris Tower Project 13) has launched. Touted as the “largest group Street Art exhibition ever carried out,” a tower in the 13th Arrondissement slated for demolition at the end of the year has been enshrined by over one hundred artists from all over the world before its destruction. Each artist was given a space, wall, apartment, ceiling to create their work on, inside and out the 4,500 sq meter edifice. With the support of City Hall, ICF Habitat La Sabliere, and Galerie Itinerrance, the project remained secret for many months. The list of artists is impressive, and way too extensive to include here…but some names include: Ludo, El Seed, Legz, Sean Hart, Sumo, and Vhils, just to name a very few.

The exhibit will be up for the entire month of October, and then the building will close and prepare for demolition. For anyone that can’t make it to Paris by then, the website is impressively comprehensive and immersive, taking you room by room and floor by floor with 360˚ views.

Here’s a teaser video from galerie Itinerrance:

Ark Nova: Inflatable Concert Hall

Lucerne Festival, Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki collaboration, inflatable concert hall Ark NovaLucerne Festival, Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki collaboration, inflatable concert hall Ark NovaLucerne Festival, Anish Kapoor and Arata Isozaki collaboration, inflatable concert hall Ark NovaClick to enlarge

A little over a year ago I posted about a project in the works called Ark Nova, an inflatable, mobile, concert hall, and now, suddenly, it’s a reality. A beautiful one at that. I suppose it’s not surprising when two extremely talented creative professionals—in this case artist Anish Kapoor and architect Arata Isozaki—collaborate along with the Lucerne Festival. This unique structure made of purple parachute material inflates in approximately two hours and seats 500. Starting October 14th, the theater will open to the public hosting concerts and other events around the tsunami-stricken areas of Japan.

Photos courtesy of the Lucerne Festival.

via colossal

Empire Drive-In: NY Hall of Science

Empire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventClick to enlarge

Lately, each consecutive summer in NYC seems to top the last in offerings of outdoor film screenings. Locations range from parks, to restaurant backyards, to rooftops and even beaches. And now, the concept is extending into the fall with an additional twist: a drive-in. Not just your usual run-of-the-mill drive-in, which in itself would be cool and intriguing enough, but Empire Drive-In is a junk car drive-in, upcycling wrecked cars rescued from junkyards and repurposing them as seats for audience members to climb into, and onto, while watching films projected on a 40-foot screen made of salvaged wood. The masterminds behind the project—which will be held outside the New York Hall of Science in Corona Park, Queens, starting October 4th and running though the 20th—are Jeff Stark (whose name seems to be associated with many an interesting NYC event) and Todd Chandler. The two Brooklyn-based artists have previously created other Empire Drive-Ins, most recently last year at the Abandon Normal Devices Festival in Manchester, UK. Stark and Chandler, along with a team of other artists and craftspeople have set out, in this age of consumerism, to create a sense of possibility  by focusing on re-use, designing something new and special while salvaging and repurposing waste. In cleaning up the cars, which will have stereo audio transmitted via radio directly to each car, the crew found all kinds of interesting personal artifacts from car deodorizers to letters, which they have chosen to keep in the cars to “create a story”. The audience is urged to explore.

Opening night promises to be fun with a 30-Pianists-on-Casio-keyboards performance, in addition to a stellar line-up of films from Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, and Oliver Hardy, to Jim Jarmusch’s Night On Earth. You can see the rest of the schedule here.

All photos & video courtesy of Empire Drive-In

via gothamist

#GettyStation: Chelsea Art Installation

Getty Station art installation in Chelsea, Sheep Station, 239 10th Avenue, Michael Shvo, Francois-Xavier Lalanne's surrealist sculpted sheep, public art, nycGetty Station art installation in Chelsea, Sheep Station, 239 10th Avenue, Michael Shvo, Francois-Xavier Lalanne's surrealist sculpted sheep, public art, nycGetty Station art installation in Chelsea, Sheep Station, 239 10th Avenue, Michael Shvo, Francois-Xavier Lalanne's surrealist sculpted sheep, public art, nycClick to enlarge

Driving uptown (yes, once in a while I have access to a car and actually drive in the city) I noticed, at a red light, a bizarrely rural and bucolic sight in the middle of Chelsea. What used to be a LukOil gas station up until what seemed very recently, was now an impressively landscaped abandoned gas station––complete with a hilly lawn, neatly trimmed bushes, and a white fence––without car access or paved driveway to the pumps. I pulled over to take a look, as well as some photos, and tried to get the scoop from the guard pacing the lawn. All the guard knew, or cared to share, (I imagine the poor man gets bombarded with questions by the minute) was confirmation that, indeed, this was an art installation and he pointed to the sign “#GettyStation” and said “Check twitter.”

I googled instead and discovered that 239 10th Avenue, where the gas station currently resides, was purchased by developer (and art collector) Michael Shvo who will be building yet another apartment building right by the High Line. During construction, Shvo has decided to use the space to showcase public art, with the first exhibit starting Monday, Sept. 16th, titled “Sheep Station” featuring sheep sculptures by the late French artist Francois-Xavier Lalanne grazing on the lawn. Shvo plans to continue with exhibits throughout construction and eventually integrate them into the new building. So keep an eye out on the corner of 24th Street and 10th Avenue in the coming year. For now, “Sheep Station” is due to be on exhibit through October 20th. Not bad for a construction site.

Top photo: Stefan Hengst. All others: collabcubed

Station to Station: Doug Aitken

Station to Station, Doug Aitken's Nomadic Art Happening; Carsten Holler, Urs Fischer, Kenneth Anger, Ernesto Neto, Ariel Pink, No-AgeStation to Station, Doug Aitken's Nomadic Art Happening; Carsten Holler, Urs Fischer, Kenneth Anger, Ernesto Neto, Yurts, Ariel Pink, No-AgeStation to Station, Doug Aitken's Nomadic Art Happening; Carsten Holler, Urs Fischer, Kenneth Anger, Ernesto Neto, Yurts, Ariel Pink, No-AgeStation to Station, Doug Aitken's Nomadic Art Happening; Carsten Holler, Urs Fischer, Kenneth Anger, Ernesto Neto, Yurts, Ariel Pink, No-AgeClick to enlarge

On Friday night, eagerly anticipating the arrival of Doug Aitken‘s (previously here) latest project Station to Station, I went to the first stop and kick-off of this unique multi-city art and music ”nomadic happening“. The pre-event coverage was rather vague, so I was trying to wrap my head around how a train was going to make its way over to the Williamsburg waterfront and, well, the answer is, it didn’t. In fact, the beautiful glowing train exists, but—at least at the New York stop—it wasn’t included in the actual event, but rather, as the means, cool as it may be, of transportation for the artists, musicians, chefs and other participants.

However, despite the lack of train viewing, art and music were definitely supplied in abundance within a festive atmosphere on the most perfect of fall-like nights. Five nomadic sculptures/yurts were set up outside, each designed by a different artist and open for shoeless entry by guests. These installations included an orange-y glowing one by Ernesto Neto; a white, smokey one, with a disco ball by Urs Fischer; Kenneth Anger’s bright red yurt with two video panels screening “Lucifer Rising”; a yellow tensile structure by Carsten Höller; and a completely dark yurt that I was not able to experience properly and not sure of the artist either, sorry. Inside the large Riverfront Studios stood a wooden yurt containing a gift shop. Also inside, is where the music was performed (bands included No-Age, Suicide, Yoshimio, and Ariel Pink.) But, possibly, what I enjoyed most about the whole event were the films screened behind the musicians and between sets. These ranged from Doug Aitken’s own films to Francis Alys, Kate Casanova, Nam June Paik, and Allora & Calzadilla just to name a few. Most of the ones that I saw were truly captivating, and in the most surprising of ways. For example, Kate Casonova’s ”Ornament”, a film showing the back of the artist’s braided head with large hermit crabs crawling on it, was oddly mesmerizing. One of my favorites, however, was a series of kisses from old Hollywood films spliced together as one film, though I wasn’t able to find the name or filmmaker. It was reminiscent of that wonderfully moving scene at the end of Cinema Paradiso (a movie totally worth watching, but if you haven’t yet, then you may want to skip the spoiler-ish link above.)

Back to Station to Station. The event will be traveling all the way to San Francisco within the next three weeks making stops in nine cities and including different artists and performers in each location. If you can’t catch it live, the site is designed in such a way to be able to experience the events virtually. Definitely a great concept filled with great talent with proceeds going to support non-traditional programming at nine partner museums around the country.

Photos of trains, Carsten Höller sculpture, Kenneth Anger sculpture, and Olaf Breuning’s color bombs all courtesy of Station to Station; all other photos by collabcubed

Barbara Kruger: Belief+Doubt

Barbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtClick to enlarge

As part of an initiative to bring art to new sites within and around the Hirshhorn Museum, roughly a year ago the museum installed Barbara Kruger’s Belief+Doubt exhibit to fill the Lower Level lobby and extend into the newly relocated bookstore. The supersized words that have increasingly become Kruger’s trademark, create an environment that surrounds the viewer with language. The walls, floors, and escalators are all wrapped in text-printed vinyl that address themes of consumerism and power. I love when type takes over a space and choosing a highly-trafficked area that includes so many different angles with the stairs is particularly dramatic. The exhibit will continue through December 2014, so if you find yourself in Washington D.C. in the next year and a half, you might want to stop by the Hirshhorn to have a look in person.

Here it is being installed:

Photos by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the artist.

via juxtapozed

Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY

Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedMarc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedMarc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedClick to enlarge

It’s hard to be in the vicinity of Parsons School of Design this summer and not be lured toward its exhibit window. The expression on the person’s face in the second photo is probably similar to the one I had when I crossed the street a couple of weeks ago, catching a glimpse of these striking floating structures from the corner of my eye. Turns out, these digitally sculpted dancers, titled Les Danseurs du Tailor, are the work of one of this year’s Architectural League Prize winners, Brooklyn-based Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY. Fornes is a leader in the development of computation applied to design and digital fabrication. He realizes geometrically complex and self-supporting structures for both artistic and commercial purposes, from pop-up stores (such as the Louis Vuitton Pop-up Store in London with Yayoi Kusama- 6th photo from top) to gallery installations and park pavilions. I don’t exactly understand the process, but Fornes digitally designs these skins—which are then produced either in carbon fiber, hand-riveted aluminum, or plastic—by analyzing and evaluating the algorithms and rules encoded in computational systems against the explicit forms, resulting in precise but unpredictable operations. Whatever the process, the results are show-stoppingly stunning.

Photos: Francois Lauginie; Guillaume Blanc; Stephane Muratet; and Moss Bureau

Llyn Foulkes: One-Man Band

Llyn Foulkes, Collage, multimedia portraits, anti-corporate, political art, New Museum exhibitLlyn Foulkes, Collage, multimedia portraits, anti-corporate, political art, New Museum exhibitLlyn Foulkes, Collage, multimedia portraits, anti-corporate, political art, New Museum exhibitClick to enlarge

Not only did we enjoy Hollie Chastain‘s collages on Saturday, but right before that we went to the New Museum and saw Llyn Foulke’s collage-like work. I was not familiar with Foulke’s art and was surprised to find out that the Los Angeles based artist is a contemporary of John Baldessari, Robert Irwin and Ed Ruscha. Though his work is quite varied in style, there’s a consistency in his portraits (our favorites) that makes it hard to differentiate between the ones created in the 1970s and those completed just a couple of years ago. Foulkes’ portraits are fabulous. Some are a little gruesome à la Francis Bacon, but feel more like anti-corporate commentary (it’s funny that Foulkes is LA-based and much of his work gives it to Disney hard) than tortured souls. Many of these works have a wonderful 3D quality, with arms or ties protruding from the frames. Foulkes has always been a bit eclectic ranging in style from Pop to Dadaist as well as being a performance artist with his own one-man band playing “The Machine” which he created himself.

You can see Llyn Foulkes’ work at the New Museum through September 1, 2013.

Photos courtesy of the artist and the New Museum.

Hollie Chastain: Book Cover Collage

Hollie Chastain, Book Cover Collages, Contemporary collage on old book covers, The Hole Summer Reading exhibitHollie Chastain, Book Cover Collages, Contemporary collage on old book covers, The Hole Summer Reading exhibitHollie Chastain, Book Cover Collages, Contemporary collage on old book covers, The Hole Summer Reading exhibitClick to enlarge

We stopped by the hole here in NYC over the weekend to see their Summer Reading group show—an exhibit that combines a reading room atmosphere interspersed with book-related art—and became enamored with Hollie Chastain’s book cover collages. The Tennessee-based artist has worked in multiple mediums but collage stole her heart at an early age. Chastain uses found materials including old book covers, and lets the scribbles, labels, and aging quality dictate the direction of the piece. These charming and detailed works combine the archival with colorful geometric shapes and patterns, making them antique-y and contemporary at the same time. Lovely. Lucky for me, and anyone else who enjoys these as much, Chastain has an etsy shop where she sells some original works and limited edition prints.

Robert Barta: Crossing Half a Million Stars

robert Barta, installation art, crossing half a million stars, half a million metal balls on floor of gallery to walk over carefullyrobert Barta, installation art, crossing half a million stars, half a million metal balls on floor of gallery to walk over carefullyrobert Barta, installation art, crossing half a million stars, half a million metal balls on floor of gallery to walk over carefullyClick to enlarge

German artist Robert Barta uses everyday objects in his work. His installation Crossing Half A Million Stars — currently on view at Galerie Sherin Najjar in Berlin — consists of roughly half a million 8mm metal balls or ball bearings that cover the gallery floor. Visitors are invited to enter the space and attempt to walk/cross the ball-covered surface with extreme care to avoid slipping or falling. The installation could be seen as a performance art piece with the viewer/participant as the performer. Makes for an entertaining gallery visit, with everyone slipping and rolling into one another. Wonder if guests have to sign a waiver before entering, or maybe lawsuits are more of an American passtime.

Crossing Half A Million Stars will be on view through September 7, 2013.

via galerie sherin najjar

Giuseppe Agnello: Memories|Lateral & Oblique

giuseppe agnello, memories- lateral and oblique views exhibit, contemporary surreal italian sculpture, humans as trees, naturegiuseppe agnello, memories- lateral and oblique views exhibit, contemporary surreal italian sculpture, humans as trees, naturegiuseppe agnello, memories- lateral and oblique views exhibit, contemporary surreal italian sculpture, humans as trees, natureClick to enlarge

Sicilian sculptor Giuseppe Agnello gives new meaning to the expression “one with nature.” His surreal sculptures of bodies with roots, branches, or tree trunks emanating from heads, feet, or chests, are at once intriguing and disturbing. Working in plaster, polyester resin, clay and bronze, the Palermo-based artist plays with the idea of metamorphosis, much of the time incorporating tree-like morphing, though not limiting himself to vegetation, as in the case of his Corpi nuvolosi (Cloudy Bodies) or his zipped up bodies in Anima e corpo (Body and Soul.)

Agnello currently has an exhibit of 40 works titled Memories: Lateral and Oblique Views at the Carlos V Tower in Porto Empedocle, Sicily through the end of the year.

via balarm

Near Unison: Dan Dodds

Near Unison Prototype for Burning Man 2013, Kinetic Art Fair, Dan Dodds, Swings, sand, human pendulumNear Unison Prototype for Burning Man 2013, Kinetic Art Fair, Dan Dodds, Swings, sand, human pendulumNear Unison Prototype for Burning Man 2013, Kinetic Art Fair, Dan Dodds, Swings, sand, human pendulumClick to enlarge

UK-based architectural designer and artist, Dan Dodds, has proposed an installation for Burning Man 2013 titled Near Unison that visualizes the harmonic relationship between two people using a pair of pendulum swings. A prototype of Near Unison, sans the elegant and striking exterior structure, was exhibited at this year’s Kinetic Art Fair. The installation specifically explores the harmonograph — a machine that became popular as a 19th century capable of producing beautiful drawings by mapping the relationship between two swinging pendulums. The oscillation frequency of the pendulums can be changed by modifying their lengths. Near Unison acts as a large-scale interactive harmonograph, allowing people to take the place of the pendulum weights, swinging back and forth, creating patterns in the sand that are ‘near unison’ a 1:1 ratio when the people occupying the swings are of similar weight. You can see the prototype in action below and keep your eyes peeled for the even larger version at the next Burning Man Festival in Black Rock Desert this August. Should be fun.