Swing Time: Höweler + Yoon Architecture

Swing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightSwing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightSwing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightIt’s a cool glow-in-the-dark playground. No, it’s an art installation. Well, actually, husband-and-wife team Eric Höweler + Meejin Yoon of the Boston-based Höweler + Yoon Architecture were striving for both. The temporary installation titled Swing Time, located in a public park space next to the Boston Convention Center in South Boston, consists of 20 glowing oval swings that encase LED lights which activate with the swings’ movement. When forces are static and the swings are not in use, they emit a soft, white light that illuminates the area. When the swings are in motion, the micro-controller switches the light from white to purple, creating a more colorful glowing effect. Swing Time is part of an initiative to create the first interactive public space in the city, with the goal to entice people of all ages to play. If you’re in Boston, you might want to check it out.

via urdesign via notcot

Shadowing: Jonathan Chomko & Matthew Rosier

Playable City Award 2014, Shadowing, light installation by Jonathan Chomko and Matthew RosierPlayable City Award 2014, Shadowing, light installation by Jonathan Chomko and Matthew RosierPlayable City Award 2014, Shadowing, light installation by Jonathan Chomko and Matthew RosierI get a particular thrill out of exploring and discovering things on my own, by chance. I’m not a big fan of GPS and forever get annoyed at the level of detail on Mapquest or Google maps when trying to get directions. For me, part of the fun is making the effort to figure it out myself and the mistakes I may make in doing so are part of the adventure. So it’s not surprising that I like the concept behind Watershed’s Playable City Award in Bristol. In their second year, The Playable City Award aims at getting people to use technology to capture that element of surprise/fun and adventure instead of using it to  solely engineer our lives. They invite entrants from all over the world to submit ideas that use technology to create playful interactions connecting the people of the city and helping them engage with their surroundings in unexpected ways.

This year’s award of 30,000 pounds was presented to New York-based interactive designer Jonathan Chomko and Treviso-based architect/designer Matthew Rosier for their interactive light installation titled Shadowing. Using infrared tracking and triggered projections, the shadow of a previous passerby will be replayed to the next person who walks under a modified streetlight. The creators are hoping for a playful experience, though there is potential for a little creepiness, too, but they are working on ideas to avoid that as well as many more features before Shadowing is unveiled to the public on September 10, 2014.

I suppose you could say that by posting this I’ve spoiled the element of discovery and surprise, and you’d probably be correct. Sorry. Quick…stop reading! But, if your memory is as bad as mine, even if you happen to be one of the few people reading this who will be in Bristol come September, the odds of remembering this as you pass under a streetlight are quite slim.

If you’re not one to care about spoilers, you can see Chomko and Rosier’s animated prototype below.

Miguel Chevalier: Magic Carpets 2014

Projected light create patterns that cover floor of Sacre Coeur, Morocco, Miguel Chevalier, Light artist, cool installationProjected light create patterns that cover floor of Sacre Coeur, Morocco, Miguel Chevalier, Light artist, cool installationProjected light create patterns that cover floor of Sacre Coeur, Morocco, Miguel Chevalier, Light artist, cool installationFrench transmedia artist Miguel Chevalier presented Magic Carpets 2014 in Morocco at the beginning of the month. The spectacular lighting installation turned the massive floor of the Sacré Coeur church in Casablanca into a joyful interactive experience. From a sea of vibrantly colored spirals to pixels that gave way to cellular-inspired patterns, the contemporary animated projections moved along nicely complemented by Michel Redolfi’s music. See it in action in the video below. I could see this working very nicely at our own Park Avenue Armory here in NYC…hint, hint.

via designboom

Iván Navarro: This Land is Your Land

Ivan Navarro, Water Tower neon light art installation, This Land is Your Land, Madison Square Park, NYCIvan Navarro, Water Tower neon light art installation, This Land is Your Land, Madison Square Park, NYCIvan Navarro, Water Tower neon light art installation, This Land is Your Land, Madison Square Park, NYCIf you walk by Madison Square Park here in NYC from now through April 13th, you’ll spot a confusing sight: three water towers, the sort we usually see perched atop the city’s buildings holding much of our water supply—and usually a familiar part of the urban landscape. The three tanks in the park, however, do not contain water but rather are Brooklyn-based Chilean artist Iván Navarro’s (previously here and here) latest light installation titled This Land is Your Land after the Woody Guthrie song. This site-specific piece “reflects” the experience of immigration through mirrored neon type, as well as a neon ladder, that repeat infinitely within the wooden cylinders. The word “me” reflects becoming “we” alternating up the interior of one tank, while “BED” in another. I stopped by during the day and then again at night to see these and enjoyed the experience both ways. Having them stand low in the park, with the backdrop of the Flatiron building from one angle and, at night, each one glowing downward with the brightly lit Empire State Building behind from a different position, make the choice of location all the more appropriate. So, make a point to pass by, and peek under, Navarro’s water towers before April 13th.

Photos: James Ewing via Madison Sq. Park’s flickr; Paul Kasmin Gallery; and collabcubed.

Doug Wheeler: Rotational Horizon Installation

Doug Wheeler, cool light installation, rotational horizon, David Zwirner Gallery, nyc, contemporary artDoug Wheeler, cool light installation, rotational horizon, David Zwirner Gallery, nyc, contemporary artDoug Wheeler, cool light installation, rotational horizon, David Zwirner Gallery, nyc, contemporary artA couple of weekends ago, when Dan was in town for a short visit, we went over to the David Zwirner Gallery in Chelsea to catch the new Doug Wheeler light installation. Having been to the previous Wheeler show two years ago (here) I was very excited to share the experience with my daughter. Unlike the last exhibit, there was no line. In fact, we were asked if we had a reservation, which spurred a moment of panic but, fortunately in our case, it was of no consequence. However, also unlike SA MI 75 DZ NY 12  this Wheeler light installation was less surprising and disorienting, which isn’t a bad thing, just different. While the last exhibit was a bit unnerving upon entry — not being able to tell where the room began or ended — this domed room shows its edge and horizon line right from the door. The previous work instilled a bit of anxiety, this one a calm and soothing effect. As in many of Wheeler’s works the immersive environment emphasizes the viewer’s physical experience of space, in this case focusing attention on the way light almost imperceptibly changes along the horizon as the earth turns. If the last exhibit installation felt like being in a cloud, I would equate this one (based on no personal experience, obviously) to a moon-like atmosphere. Forget watching George Clooney in Gravity, head over to David Zwirner and immerse yourself in Doug Wheeler’s rotational horizon. Best to make a reservation, just to be on the safe side. The installation will be up through March 29, 2014.

Third photo courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery. All others collabcubed.

Coffin as Solarium: Younes Baba-Ali

Coffin as sunbed, ending your life under the sun, Younes Baba-Ali, contemporary sculpture, Moroccan art, Belgian art, suntan bed as coffinCoffin as sunbed, ending your life under the sun, Younes Baba-Ali, contemporary sculpture, Moroccan art, Belgian art, suntan bed as coffinCoffin as sunbed, ending your life under the sun, Younes Baba-Ali, contemporary sculpture, Moroccan art, Belgian art, suntan bed as coffinWinter is a time of migration to warmer climate, not only by birds, but, in the past generation or two, among many of the professionally retired in western societies. And right about now, in the midst of our fourth or fifth snowstorm here in NYC — I’ve lost count — the thought is completely understandable and immensely appealing. Moroccan-born visual and sound artist Younes Baba-Ali, who splits his time between Brussels and Casablanca, has an interesting take on the phenomenon of “migratory flux”. His installation/sculpture titled Ending Your Life Under the Sun converts a coffin into a tanning bed, or is it the other way around? Who hasn’t associated those sun beds with coffins at some point? If you can get past the slightly morbid aspect, there’s definitely wiggle room for a chuckle.

via Sabrina Amrani Gallery

Onion Skin: Olivier Ratsi

Olivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi is a French visual artist whose work is mainly based upon representations of space’s perception and the experience of reality. His audiovisual immersive installation, Onion Skin, offers the viewer a changing perspective of space and time. Consisting of two walls set up perpendicular to each other and serving as canvases on which a series of animated geometric shapes are projected—along with sound—a new dimension is slowly revealed. Using repetition and scale, the anamorphic visuals play tricks on the viewer, having what initially seemed flat, suddenly delineate a new space, consequently altering their perception of depth all the while having a hypnotic effect. The illusion appears as the “onion skins” seem to peel away and leave their physical surface behind. Here’s a video:

via rooms magazine