OK Go: The Writing’s on the Wall

OK Go's video for The Writing's on the Wall with anamorphic effects, cool sets, cool videoOK Go's video for The Writing's on the Wall with anamorphic effects, cool sets, cool videoOK Go's video for The Writing's on the Wall with anamorphic effects, cool sets, cool videoIt’s been a couple of years, but it comes as no surprise that OK Go’s latest music video for their new single “The Writing’s on the Wall” is amazing. It may even top all the others, if that’s possible. With one tricky optical illusion after another, the clip includes the anamorphic effects and styles of artists such as Felice Varini, Vik Muniz, Bela Borsodi, and one of our favorites, Boa Mistura. The project took roughly three weeks (looks like it would have taken even longer!) and fifty takes before wrapping. The last scene revealing the crew is terrific, adding yet another dimension, and the sense of joy at having completed the impressive project shines through. In addition, the playing with perspective (more than one way to see things) goes hand-in-hand with the somewhat sad lyrics, despite the upbeat tune.

Watch the video below. OK Go’s new album Hungry Ghosts, which includes this song, is due out in October.

via colossal and rollingstone

Onion Skin: Olivier Ratsi

Olivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi is a French visual artist whose work is mainly based upon representations of space’s perception and the experience of reality. His audiovisual immersive installation, Onion Skin, offers the viewer a changing perspective of space and time. Consisting of two walls set up perpendicular to each other and serving as canvases on which a series of animated geometric shapes are projected—along with sound—a new dimension is slowly revealed. Using repetition and scale, the anamorphic visuals play tricks on the viewer, having what initially seemed flat, suddenly delineate a new space, consequently altering their perception of depth all the while having a hypnotic effect. The illusion appears as the “onion skins” seem to peel away and leave their physical surface behind. Here’s a video:

via rooms magazine

Plasti-Scenes: Movie Scenes in Plasticine

movie scenes made out of plasticine, modelling clay, little miss sunshinemovie scenes made out of plasticine, modelling clay, casinomovie scenes made out of plasticine, modelling clay, casinoI came across a contest on Little White Lies magazine from a while back that made me smile. The creative brief asked that participants “recreate an iconic movie scene out of modelling clay” also known as plasticine, hence their title Plasti-Scene…yes, it’s clever. I’m not sure if the entries are exclusively from artists, or non-artists as well. Some of the entries were very slick and well done but, honestly, some of my favorites tend to be the less perfect ones. All the films and creators are identified next to their piece except the bottom two which are scenes from “Psycho” by Sarah Randell and “The Big Lebowski” by Gordon Shaw. These are just a sampling from the 60 entries. You can see the rest here and the winners here.

Mike and Claire

Mike and Claire, Performance Art, Gifs, Costume Design, crazy, wacky, goofy characters/artMike and Claire, Performance Art, Gifs, Costume Design, crazy, wacky, goofy characters/artMike and Claire, Performance Art, Gifs, Costume Design, crazy, wacky, goofy characters/artMike and Claire, Performance Art, Gifs, Costume Design, crazy, wacky, goofy characters/artMike and Claire, Performance Art, Gifs, Costume Design, crazy, wacky, goofy characters/art

NYC-based artist dynamic duo Mike Bailey-Gates and Claire Christerson, aka Mike and Claire, blend their love of performance, costume design, and film in their zany videos and gifs, creating a whole slew of characters, from humorous to disturbing. Their inspiration? Artists including Ryan Trecartin, Cindy Sherman, and Nina Hagen, as well as New York City nightlife with an emphasis on queer, subculture events. They tend to use themselves in their work with props they’ve collected, as well as costumes that Claire creates. They met as students at the School of Visual Arts and have been collaborating ever since.

You can see much more of the nuttiness on their site.

via papermag

 

T. J. Wilcox: In the Air at the Whitney

In the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumClick to enlarge

Currently, the second floor of the Whitney Museum is largely taken up by New York-based artist T. J. Wilcox‘s dramatic 360˚ panoramic film installation titled “In the Air”. The giant circular screen measuring roughly 7 feet high and 35 feet in diameter projects the span of a day in the city, from dawn to dusk, sped up to run in a 30-minute cycle. Inspired by the views from the roof of the building where he has his studio in Union Square, Wilcox filmed, or actually shot 60,000 stills, shot at the rate of one per second, and seamlessly patched together. Superimposed on this vista are six short films that loop, each with a NYC connection. From a documentary/portrait of the Empire State Building to Warhol inflating his silver helium balloons on the roof of his Factory, to Wilcox’s super recounting his personal witnessing of September 11 from that very roof.

I’m looking forward to seeing this exhibit soon—with my newly gifted membership—but, more interestingly, here is Wilcox speaking a bit on the work:

“In the Air” will be up at the Whitney through February 9, 2014.

Top photo by Fred R. Conrad for the NY Times; second photo courtesy of the Whitney; bottom three photos by Clare Henry.

Empire Drive-In: NY Hall of Science

Empire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventClick to enlarge

Lately, each consecutive summer in NYC seems to top the last in offerings of outdoor film screenings. Locations range from parks, to restaurant backyards, to rooftops and even beaches. And now, the concept is extending into the fall with an additional twist: a drive-in. Not just your usual run-of-the-mill drive-in, which in itself would be cool and intriguing enough, but Empire Drive-In is a junk car drive-in, upcycling wrecked cars rescued from junkyards and repurposing them as seats for audience members to climb into, and onto, while watching films projected on a 40-foot screen made of salvaged wood. The masterminds behind the project—which will be held outside the New York Hall of Science in Corona Park, Queens, starting October 4th and running though the 20th—are Jeff Stark (whose name seems to be associated with many an interesting NYC event) and Todd Chandler. The two Brooklyn-based artists have previously created other Empire Drive-Ins, most recently last year at the Abandon Normal Devices Festival in Manchester, UK. Stark and Chandler, along with a team of other artists and craftspeople have set out, in this age of consumerism, to create a sense of possibility  by focusing on re-use, designing something new and special while salvaging and repurposing waste. In cleaning up the cars, which will have stereo audio transmitted via radio directly to each car, the crew found all kinds of interesting personal artifacts from car deodorizers to letters, which they have chosen to keep in the cars to “create a story”. The audience is urged to explore.

Opening night promises to be fun with a 30-Pianists-on-Casio-keyboards performance, in addition to a stellar line-up of films from Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, and Oliver Hardy, to Jim Jarmusch’s Night On Earth. You can see the rest of the schedule here.

All photos & video courtesy of Empire Drive-In

via gothamist

Artist’s Face – Balloons: Laurina Paperina

Laurina Paperina, Artists BalloonsLaurina Paperina, Artists BalloonsLaurina Paperina, Artists BalloonsClick to enlarge

Last Thursday evening I went to Chelsea for the launch of the Fall Season and openings at many of the galleries. At Freight+Volume, as part of a group show titled “The Decline and Fall of the Art World, Part II” is where I had my first look at Italian artist Laurina Paperina‘s humorous work that pokes fun at the art world, including herself. Her short animated episodes titled “How to Kill the Artists” (see a sample below) were making viewers laugh out loud in some cases, and now, looking at her website, I see that she has variations on the theme. Her witty series Artist’s Face – Balloons, charmingly captures these artists and their work style on balloon heads, or, more accurately, on photos of people holding up balloons in front of their heads. From Murakami and Banksy to Keith Haring and  Frida Kahlo. Paperina states in her bio that she “does not want to make serious art.” I think she has met her goal.