Gingerbread & Candy Art Museums

Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Louvre, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinClick to enlarge

Sure, it’s that time of year when visions of sugar plums dance in your head, and gingerbread houses abound. But New Zealand-born artist/photographer Henry Hargreaves based in Brooklyn and stylist/chef Caitlin Levin took their holiday creations to new heights. The two have collaborated on several projects in the past (Deep Fried Gadgets being a largely recognizable one,) but their latest collaboration took the form of Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums & Galleries for ArtBasel/Miami. These amazing models of the iconic institutions were made using gingerbread, hard candy, chocolate, licorice, and many other tasty sweets. Hargreaves and Levin made tabletop-size replicas of the Louvre, Guggenheim, Maxxi, Tate Modern, Karuizawa Gallery, MAS, and Soumaya and then cleverly lit and photographed each one.

You can see more of the process here.

via grit and neatorama

Moving Icon: Kalhöfer-Korschildgen

Moving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryMoving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryMoving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryClick to enlarge

Moving Icon is a mobile pop-up pavilion designed by Cologne-based Kalhöfer-Korschildgen that travels around the Westphalian region of Germany providing its visitors with information on local architectural history. The compact house-like mini-museum attaches to the back of a car and, with the click of a remote control, literally ‘pops’ open transforming into a lovely illuminated pavilion. The exhibit includes both analogue and digital displays and incorporates typography into its structure and signage in a clever and designy manner. The display is interactive and can be customized for any location.

Photos by Jörg Hempel

Sam Falls: Tuileries Colored Sculpture

Tuileries Colored Sculpture, Sam Falls, Untitled, Hors les murs, Balic Hertling Gallery  Tuileries Colored Sculpture, Sam Falls, Untitled, Hors les murs, Balic Hertling Gallery  Tuileries Colored Sculpture, Sam Falls, Untitled, Hors les murs, Balic Hertling Gallery  Click to enlarge

Los Angeles artist Sam Falls created an Untitled sculpture for Hors les Murs, a public art event in Paris, made up of colored metal boxes. The exterior of these multi-color windowed pieces was coated in a UV-protected pigment. The inside of the same boxes were treated with an unprotected paint. Though each respective panel appears to be the same color on both sides, the sides facing inwards will all fade in the sun. The form that each sculpture takes is dictated by the shadows that fall on the inside of the sculpture and the gradient of sunlight is revealed over time, burned into the sculpture like a photograph. Unlike most outdoor sculptures usually designed to stand the test of time as well as the elements, Falls’ Untitled (Tuileries Colored Sculpture) is meant to age the way we do. But, there’s a final twist! Once the interior panels fade through their top coat, the bottom coat from the exterior will start to emerge, reversing the aging effect, and revealing the bright saturated color once again. Not so much what we as humans go through, though maybe if we exfoliate enough….

Photos: Courtesy Balice Hertling (Paris) et Eva Presenhuber (Zürich); FdN77’s twitter; Miami Herald; le banc moussu; and dalbera’s flickr.

via fiac

Net Blow-Up Yokohama: Numen/For Use

Numen/For Use, inflatable net blow-up in Yokohama, for playNumen/For Use, inflatable net blow-up in Yokohama, for playNumen/For Use, inflatable net blow-up in Yokohama, for playClick to enlarge

The Numen/For Use (previously here and here) guys are at it again. Known for their fun, playful, interactive structures, the Croatian-Austrian collective has recently gone inflatable. Their latest installation in Yokohama (home of the also fun CupNoodles Museum) looks like a carnival Moonwalk gone wild. The stylized cloud-like object has nets inside connected to its inner lining that expand and become taut as the blob is blown up. The exterior membrane is sheer enough that when lit from within, it acts as a projection screen for the activity inside. The nets provide climbing and tumbling surfaces on multiple levels. Looks like a blast.

via vizkultura via notcot

Lauren Tickle Jewelry: Increasing Value

Lauren Vanessa Tickle, Jewelry made with US Currency, brooches & necklaces made with money, Increasing Value Lauren Vanessa Tickle, Jewelry made with US Currency, brooches & necklaces made with money, Increasing ValueLauren Vanessa Tickle, Jewelry made with US Currency, brooches & necklaces made with money, Increasing ValueClick to enlarge

Dan and Em attended the RISD Entrepreneur Mindshare conference in Providence, RI a couple of weeks back and, among the many interesting presentations, they saw artist/jewelry designer Lauren Tickle speak about her work.

The Brooklyn-based RISD Alum has a series of jewelry pieces under the title Increasing Value. In these brooches, necklaces & earrings, Tickle takes US currency of a designated value and cuts it apart, then pieces these delicate and ornate elements together creating a new object of greater value: jewelry. This experiment questioning value, adornment, and materialism is meant to make the wearer reflect on these social constructs in today’s society.

A couple of Tickle’s works, such as the $16.50 Necklace which sells for 100x its original currency value, can be purchased at the MoMA Design Store.

All photos courtesy of the artist.

Three Architecture Firms Design with New Lego

Snohetta Architects participate in Wired's Lego Architecture Studio Set challengeSOM Architects participate in Wired's Lego Architecture Studio Set challengeSOM Architects participate in Wired's Lego Architecture Studio Set challengeClick to enlarge

I certainly would have enjoyed Lego’s new Architecture Studio Set as a kid. I loved building minimalist houses (okay, so they were more like cubes or rectangular blocks with a door, but I felt like the future Mies Van der Rohe) using all the white and gray pieces, and snatching the few translucents included in our set from my brother.

Wired Magazine had the fun idea of asking three world-class architecture firms to ‘go crazy’ with the new Legos. And crazy they did. Norway-based firm Snøhetta created a striking boomerang-shaped tower, playing with equilibrium. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM) inspired by the wintry environs of their Chicago office, cleverly froze their multi-level structure in a block of ice, slowly revealing its interior intricacies as it melted. And finally, SHoP Architects in NYC, created a futuristic cityscape going as far as 3D printing some curved pieces of their own to create undulating walls.

You can see more photos of the above projects here, and you can buy Lego Architecture Studio here.

via wired

LAb[au]: Signal to Noise

Cool type installation for Luminato Festival in Toronto; Signal to Noise by Lab[au] studio in Belgian with Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els VermangCool type installation for Luminato Festival in Toronto; Signal to Noise by Lab[au] studio in Belgian with Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els VermangCool type installation for Luminato Festival in Toronto; Signal to Noise by Lab[au] studio in Belgian with Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els VermangClick to enlarge

It doesn’t feel like that long ago that we’d hear the flapping noise of the information displays at most train stations and airports, yet quietly, and almost unnoticeably, they have mostly transitioned over to LED monitors. Belgian artist team LAb[au] consisting of Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els Vermang, created a playful type installation for Toronto’s Luminato Festival last year, utilizing the discarded technology and salvaged split-flaps from these old signage systems, arranged in a circular grid. Signal to Noise, as the piece is called, takes the random letters from the illegible and nonsensical into the legible and poetic, through its flipping mechanism. Apparently the sound is much subtler than in the video below; almost like rain. Best to see it in action:

Photos courtesy of LAb[au]

via canadian art junkie

Richard Dupont: Hanging Heads

Richard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureRichard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureRichard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureRichard Dupont, Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital, Museum of Art and Design, Hanging Heads, Silicone head sculptures, body scan sculptureClick to enlarge

You know you must really like an artist when two years apart, in two different locations, two different kinds of sculpture—though both heads—make you stop in awe. Today, walking by The Museum of Art and Design here in NYC, a came across a huge sculpture of what looked like a melting head. I checked inside with the museum people and the artist turned out to be Richard Dupont, whose work will be included in the show that opens October 16th titled Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital. Upon looking up Dupont’s work, I discovered that he is also the artist behind the large heads I saw, and was impressed by, a couple of years back in Chelsea filled with junk; albeit themed junk (see bottom photos). NYC born and based Dupont has been working with digital full-body scans of himself for over ten years. He likes to use technology as a tool, but is partial to the physical material over the information, preferring the results derived from “disrespecting” technology. His “Hanging Heads” as he calls them, were initially the result of an accident. Working on a foam enlargement of his head, he decided to paint it with rubber. Not happy with the outcome, Dupont peeled off the rubber coating, only to find that it came off in one piece, and then nailed it to the wall. Amazing. Can’t wait to stop by MAD to see more of Dupont’s work in person. Out of Hand will be up through July 6, 2014, so there’s time to get back there.

Top two photos: collabcubed. All other photos courtesy of the artist.

Disco Volante: Lukas Galehr

Disco ball pizza oven at Disco Volante in Austria by Lukas Galehr. Cool pizza oven.Disco ball pizza oven at Disco Volante in Vienna by Lukas Galehr. Cool pizza oven.Disco ball pizza oven at Disco Volante in Vienna by Lukas Galehr. Cool pizza oven.Click to enlarge

Austrian architect Lukas Galehr  (also part of the design collective Madame Mohr) designed the Viennese pizzeria Disco Volante including its centerpiece: a unique oversized rotating disco ball oven that glitters against the walls in the dark. Covered in hundreds of tiny mirrored tiles, the spherical pizza oven is positioned within the dining room and is anchored to a central chimney that allows it to pivot from its center. Here it is in action:

via dezeen

Empire Drive-In: NY Hall of Science

Empire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventEmpire Drive-In at the New York Hall of Science in Corona, Queens. Jeff Stark, Todd Chandler, Junkcar Drive-in, Upcycling, re-use, film, NYC eventClick to enlarge

Lately, each consecutive summer in NYC seems to top the last in offerings of outdoor film screenings. Locations range from parks, to restaurant backyards, to rooftops and even beaches. And now, the concept is extending into the fall with an additional twist: a drive-in. Not just your usual run-of-the-mill drive-in, which in itself would be cool and intriguing enough, but Empire Drive-In is a junk car drive-in, upcycling wrecked cars rescued from junkyards and repurposing them as seats for audience members to climb into, and onto, while watching films projected on a 40-foot screen made of salvaged wood. The masterminds behind the project—which will be held outside the New York Hall of Science in Corona Park, Queens, starting October 4th and running though the 20th—are Jeff Stark (whose name seems to be associated with many an interesting NYC event) and Todd Chandler. The two Brooklyn-based artists have previously created other Empire Drive-Ins, most recently last year at the Abandon Normal Devices Festival in Manchester, UK. Stark and Chandler, along with a team of other artists and craftspeople have set out, in this age of consumerism, to create a sense of possibility  by focusing on re-use, designing something new and special while salvaging and repurposing waste. In cleaning up the cars, which will have stereo audio transmitted via radio directly to each car, the crew found all kinds of interesting personal artifacts from car deodorizers to letters, which they have chosen to keep in the cars to “create a story”. The audience is urged to explore.

Opening night promises to be fun with a 30-Pianists-on-Casio-keyboards performance, in addition to a stellar line-up of films from Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, and Oliver Hardy, to Jim Jarmusch’s Night On Earth. You can see the rest of the schedule here.

All photos & video courtesy of Empire Drive-In

via gothamist

Big Fun: Chris March for Target

fun wigs, Big Fun Wigs by Chris March of Project Runway for Target, Halloween Costumes, Goofy wigsfun wigs, Big Fun Wigs by Chris March of Project Runway for Target, Halloween Costumes, Goofy wigsfun wigs, Big Fun Wigs by Chris March of Project Runway for Target, Halloween Costumes, Goofy wigsClick to enlarge

There’s that slight nip in the evening air these days and before you know it Halloween will be upon us. Em sent me a link to a line of fun wigs designed by Project Runway veteran Chris March for this Halloween season at Target. The wigs are aptly called “Big Fun“.  March designed eight styles: Geisha, Greaser, Starlet, Witch, Medusa, Monster Bride, Mohawk and Afro. The limited-time only collection, which debuted yesterday in stores and on Target.com, features fun foam wigs, each for $20 or less. I’d imagine these will be a big hit.

Machine Home: AdHoc MSL

Machine Home by adhoc msl, murcia, spain, david frutos photographer, Machine Home by adhoc msl, murcia, spain, david frutos photographer, Machine Home by adhoc msl, murcia, spainClick to enlarge

The Machine Home  in Murcia, Spain, designed by adhoc ml, can be described as a cross between the traditional dwelling and the caravan. It is easily transportable and can be put up anywhere. All it needs is a minimal foundation and a connection to MEP installations, be these existing urban services or mechanisms making for the module’s total self-sufficiency: potable and irrigation water, plumbing and purifying systems, telecommunications lines and energy-capturing devices.

The Machine Home has three main parts. The central area is for shared household activities. One of the side spaces contains the sanitary utilities on ground level and the other installations above. The other lateral space is a double-height storeroom. The central room has an overhead hole that the inhabitants climb up to, by means of two ladders, to get to the bedrooms.

Once anchored to the ground, the module proceeds to colonize the place and interact with it through a series of added elements constructed on the site: a pergola, a terrace deck, an outdoor kitchen, a pond. They bring the interior domestic space to the exterior environment by means of a double hydraulic door system that helps reinforce the disturbing machine image of the house.

Photos courtesy the architects and David Frutos.

Heart of the District: ZA Architects

Heart of the District by German ZA Architects, cool hotel design, Cut 'n' Paste exhibit MoMA, futuristic architectureHeart of the District by German ZA Architects, cool hotel design, Cut 'n' Paste exhibit MoMA, futuristic architectureHeart of the District by German ZA Architects, cool hotel design, Cut 'n' Paste exhibit MoMA, futuristic architectureClick to enlarge

A few weeks ago while taking in several exhibits at MoMA, we came upon a very interesting image as part of a digital slideshow in the architecture Cut ‘n’ Paste exhibit. After running through all the captions on the wall, we finally found what was unmistakably the corresponding one, clued in by the vital organ referenced: Heart of the District by ZA Architects. The Germany-based architecture firm came in second place in an international competition with their futuristic heart-shaped pod-like structure. Their proposal, for a hotel in NYC, integrates the street, the city dwellers, as well as the hotel guests, giving the tourist a more inside experience on their visit. The hotel rooms would reside in the existing adjacent buildings with the heart shape construction acting as a hub to draw people in and mix, acquaint them inside its tight spaces, while they partake in varied activities. The “heart’ itself would contain a playground, shop, exhibition space, café, bar, hotel reception, lounge zone, small cinema, library, conference hall. And, it goes without saying, whether you like it or not, the structure would likely become a NY icon.

All images courtesy of the architects.

Matthew Mazzotta: Open House

Open House, Matthew Mazzotta, Coleman Center for the Arts, Recycled House from private space to public Open House, Matthew Mazzotta, Coleman Center for the Arts, Recycled House from private space to public Open House, Matthew Mazzotta, Coleman Center for the Arts, Recycled House from private space to public Click to enlarge

Artist Matthew Mazzotta (previously here) teamed up with Coleman Center for the Arts and the folks of York Alabama to transform one of the town’s most blighted properties into a new public space. Using the materials of an abandoned house as well as the land it stood on, Mazzotta created one of his shape-shifting structures titled Open House. Starting in the shape of a house, the puzzle-like structure is designed to require cooperation. Four people must work together for over an hour to unfold the pieces into a multi-seat theater that can be used for performances or simply a common ground for community dialogue and activities. Everything about this project is ultra-clever and well designed: its construction (and deconstruction); the repurposing of materials; as well as the community-building aspect via the integration of the townspeople. Here’s a video with more background on the project:

Thanks Matthew!

From the CollabCubed Archives

We’re taking a little summer blogging break this month. To keep you entertained, we’ve put together easy access links to some of our more popular posts in the past months but, of course, feel free to peruse instead by category using the drop-down menu in the right sidebar, or click on the ‘random post’ icon also in the sidebar. There’s always our facebook page, as well, with links to all of our posts. And for those of you in NYC, please check out our recently launched site Culture on the Cheap offering daily suggestions of free and cheap events in New York City.

Enjoy and we’ll be back in a few weeks!

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3PTPOP: Victor-John Villanueva

3PTPOP, Victor Pump, Victor-John Villanueva, Perler Bead pop art accessories3PTPOP, Victor Pump, Victor-John Villanueva, Perler Bead pop art accessories3PTPOP, Victor Pump, Victor-John Villanueva, Perler Bead pop art accessoriesClick to enlarge

I’ve mentioned our personal appreciation/fascination for perler bead fashion accessories before and 3PTPop‘s range of portrait neckware is no exception. New York City based graphic designer Victor-John Villanueva (aka Victor Pump) is inspired by pop culture and the figures that shape it. With his label Three Point Pop he merges art and fashion. The collection features  pop culture icons and immortalizes their images in fusible beads and resin. From Andy Warhol & Anna Wintour to Pharell Williams and even Bill Cunningham, Villanueva is able to render their faces in an unmistakeable way. Even the business cards are made using the fused beads. You can purchase these works as necklaces or as framed works here and you can follow the latest designs on his blog here.

Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY

Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedMarc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedMarc Fornes & THEVERYMANY, non-lin/lin pavilion, carbon fiber shell, digitally sculptedClick to enlarge

It’s hard to be in the vicinity of Parsons School of Design this summer and not be lured toward its exhibit window. The expression on the person’s face in the second photo is probably similar to the one I had when I crossed the street a couple of weeks ago, catching a glimpse of these striking floating structures from the corner of my eye. Turns out, these digitally sculpted dancers, titled Les Danseurs du Tailor, are the work of one of this year’s Architectural League Prize winners, Brooklyn-based Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY. Fornes is a leader in the development of computation applied to design and digital fabrication. He realizes geometrically complex and self-supporting structures for both artistic and commercial purposes, from pop-up stores (such as the Louis Vuitton Pop-up Store in London with Yayoi Kusama- 6th photo from top) to gallery installations and park pavilions. I don’t exactly understand the process, but Fornes digitally designs these skins—which are then produced either in carbon fiber, hand-riveted aluminum, or plastic—by analyzing and evaluating the algorithms and rules encoded in computational systems against the explicit forms, resulting in precise but unpredictable operations. Whatever the process, the results are show-stoppingly stunning.

Photos: Francois Lauginie; Guillaume Blanc; Stephane Muratet; and Moss Bureau