Swing Time: Höweler + Yoon Architecture

Swing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightSwing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightSwing Time installation by Höweler + Yoon Architecture in Boston, September 2014. Cool light swings that glow at nightIt’s a cool glow-in-the-dark playground. No, it’s an art installation. Well, actually, husband-and-wife team Eric Höweler + Meejin Yoon of the Boston-based Höweler + Yoon Architecture were striving for both. The temporary installation titled Swing Time, located in a public park space next to the Boston Convention Center in South Boston, consists of 20 glowing oval swings that encase LED lights which activate with the swings’ movement. When forces are static and the swings are not in use, they emit a soft, white light that illuminates the area. When the swings are in motion, the micro-controller switches the light from white to purple, creating a more colorful glowing effect. Swing Time is part of an initiative to create the first interactive public space in the city, with the goal to entice people of all ages to play. If you’re in Boston, you might want to check it out.

via urdesign via notcot

Big Maze: Bjarke Ingels Group

Big Maze, Bjarke Ingels Group, BIG, in National Building Museum, WAshington DC, Labyrinth, cool art installationBig Maze, Bjarke Ingels Group, BIG, in National Building Museum, WAshington DC, Labyrinth, cool art installationBig Maze, Bjarke Ingels Group, BIG, in National Building Museum, WAshington DC, Labyrinth, cool art installationThis looks fun and since we’ll be attending festivities in Maryland this weekend, maybe we’ll be able to squeeze in a quick jaunt to the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. before the maze comes tumbling (well, maybe not tumbling) down on Monday, September 1, 2014. Danish architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) (previously here and here) has created a concave wooden labyrinth in the middle of the museum’s main hall. Constructed with maple plywood, the structure rewards your efforts by revealing a 360-degree view of the maze once you reach the center, the point where the 18 ft tall walls are clearly a lot shorter. Of course, there’s always the option to get a different—and more complete— perspective/view from the second and third floor balconies without doing all the work, but then, what fun would that be?

via wallpaper

Flederhaus: House of Hammocks

House of Hammocks, Hammock House, Vienna, Flederhaus, Heri & Salli ArchitectsHouse of Hammocks, Hammock House, Vienna, Flederhaus, Heri & Salli ArchitectsHouse of Hammocks, Hammock House, Vienna, Flederhaus, Heri & Salli ArchitectsThe Flederhaus—a pun off the word fledermaus which means ‘bat’ in German—is a fun structure in Vienna designed by architects Heri & Salli explicitly for hanging around and relaxing. The open building, situated in the Museum Quarter of the city, houses 28 hammocks on 5 floors that offer great views to one and all at no cost. The inviting hammocks are arranged to allow for meeting and interacting with neighbors. A fun public space for sure.

Photos by Mischa Erben courtesy of the architects.

Shadowing: Jonathan Chomko & Matthew Rosier

Playable City Award 2014, Shadowing, light installation by Jonathan Chomko and Matthew RosierPlayable City Award 2014, Shadowing, light installation by Jonathan Chomko and Matthew RosierPlayable City Award 2014, Shadowing, light installation by Jonathan Chomko and Matthew RosierI get a particular thrill out of exploring and discovering things on my own, by chance. I’m not a big fan of GPS and forever get annoyed at the level of detail on Mapquest or Google maps when trying to get directions. For me, part of the fun is making the effort to figure it out myself and the mistakes I may make in doing so are part of the adventure. So it’s not surprising that I like the concept behind Watershed’s Playable City Award in Bristol. In their second year, The Playable City Award aims at getting people to use technology to capture that element of surprise/fun and adventure instead of using it to  solely engineer our lives. They invite entrants from all over the world to submit ideas that use technology to create playful interactions connecting the people of the city and helping them engage with their surroundings in unexpected ways.

This year’s award of 30,000 pounds was presented to New York-based interactive designer Jonathan Chomko and Treviso-based architect/designer Matthew Rosier for their interactive light installation titled Shadowing. Using infrared tracking and triggered projections, the shadow of a previous passerby will be replayed to the next person who walks under a modified streetlight. The creators are hoping for a playful experience, though there is potential for a little creepiness, too, but they are working on ideas to avoid that as well as many more features before Shadowing is unveiled to the public on September 10, 2014.

I suppose you could say that by posting this I’ve spoiled the element of discovery and surprise, and you’d probably be correct. Sorry. Quick…stop reading! But, if your memory is as bad as mine, even if you happen to be one of the few people reading this who will be in Bristol come September, the odds of remembering this as you pass under a streetlight are quite slim.

If you’re not one to care about spoilers, you can see Chomko and Rosier’s animated prototype below.

BoaMistura: Pensar/Sentir (Think/Feel)

Boa Mistura, University of Isthmus, Panama City, Typographic Mural with students, Think/Feel, Pensar/Sentir, anamorphosis, typography, street artBoa Mistura, University of Isthmus, Panama City, Typographic Mural with students, Think/Feel, Pensar/Sentir, anamorphosis, typography, street artBoa Mistura, University of Isthmus, Panama City, Typographic Mural with students, Think/Feel, Pensar/Sentir, anamorphosis, typography, street artA recent project at the University of Isthmus in Panama City by one of my favorite Spanish art collectives, Boa Mistura (previously), engaged the architecture and industrial design students. Invited to give a two-week workshop, the artists worked with the students to create a design using their signature anamorphic style which was then executed by the students. Seeing the university as a Ciudad del Saber (City of Knowledge) they created a type mural on the side of one of the campus buildings that reads pensar (think) from one angle, and sentir (feel) from another; two key elements in obtaining knowledge.

All images courtesy of BoaMistura

Miguel Chevalier: Magic Carpets 2014

Projected light create patterns that cover floor of Sacre Coeur, Morocco, Miguel Chevalier, Light artist, cool installationProjected light create patterns that cover floor of Sacre Coeur, Morocco, Miguel Chevalier, Light artist, cool installationProjected light create patterns that cover floor of Sacre Coeur, Morocco, Miguel Chevalier, Light artist, cool installationFrench transmedia artist Miguel Chevalier presented Magic Carpets 2014 in Morocco at the beginning of the month. The spectacular lighting installation turned the massive floor of the Sacré Coeur church in Casablanca into a joyful interactive experience. From a sea of vibrantly colored spirals to pixels that gave way to cellular-inspired patterns, the contemporary animated projections moved along nicely complemented by Michel Redolfi’s music. See it in action in the video below. I could see this working very nicely at our own Park Avenue Armory here in NYC…hint, hint.

via designboom

Cornea Ti: FH Mainz

Cornea Ti, Luminale 2014, FH Mainz, Light, sound and type installation, cool artCornea Ti, Luminale 2014, FH Mainz, Light, sound and type installation, cool artCornea Ti, Luminale 2014, FH Mainz, Light, sound and type installation, cool artThe Frankfurt based Luminale 2014  — one of the world’s largest and most renowned light festivals — concluded this past weekend. As per usual, there were many impressive installations this year including Cornea Ti, a collaboration between Interior Architecture students from the School of Design Mainz and Ensemble Modern Frankfurt. Consisting of three connected containers that formed a sort of interactive stage, visitors would step through the amorphous tunnels triggering the many integrated LEDs hidden within the walls of the structure with their movements. In addition to the movement, sound caused the light to change, illuminating letterforms that would transform and morph into anagrams, only visible from the perspective of the audience. I haven’t been able to make out any words myself in the video below, but I sure do like the effect.

via luminapolis