Ross Sawyers: Dismantled Rooms

Ross Sawyers, Cool Photographs of dismantled homes, homes and walls with cracks and lightRoss Sawyers, Cool Photographs of dismantled homes, homes and walls with cracks and lightRoss Sawyers, Cool Photographs of dismantled homes, homes and walls with cracks and lightClick to enlarge

Photographer Ross Sawyers builds models of construction-site-like homes and photographs them as full-scale eerie environments. Sawyer is interested in the home and the relationships we have with our own. His most recent photos contain drawings and markings on the walls of the spaces which are related to hobo signs—a language that was developed during the Depression by transients to inform each other about neighborhoods, houses and people. Sawyer states in an interview with the Seattle Met:

…one of the things that led me to it was when foreclosures were really commonplace in maybe 2009 or 2010. A lot of people, as they were foreclosed on, would just destroy the house—whether that was through vandalism or just pure destruction—and so that got me interested in the kinds of marks and destructive actions people were inflicting upon the spaces. Through research on that, I sort of stumbled across information about hobo signs. And the relationship between those two things became really interesting to me.

Some of them have a magical feel, no? Love them.

via seattlemet

Luis Gispert: Photos of Logo-clad Car Interiors

Luis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyLuis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyLuis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyClick to enlarge

Brooklyn-based artist/photographer Luis Gispert stumbled upon a culture of fashion-label customized car interiors that would be hard not to call impressive. These luxury brand knockoffs, or ‘interpretations’ according to Gispert, are created with the same obsession, fantasy, and dedication as an artist creates his/her art. Gispert’s series of photographs of these status-seeking automobiles (mostly owned by people of modest incomes who in many cases spent much more on the customization than the actual value of the final product) was compiled as a show titled “Decepción” at Mary Boone Gallery. From an Escalade covered in Murakami “LV” prints, to Stephen Sprouse’s bright green graffitti-scribbled version; a Burberry-lined Volkswagen to a pink Coach covered car; all artworks of sorts in their own right. The perfectly paired vistas from the windshields, however, are separate landscape photographs taken by Gispert and perfectly matched to emphasize the extremes between natural beauty and the questionable taste of our consumerist society.

You can see more of Gispert’s work on his website.

via musée

#Encaja_dos: Lagaleriademagdalena

Lagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridClick to enlarge

Las Magdalenas of Lagaleriademagdalena (previously here) have been at it again. Actually, they never stop. About a year ago the duo set up a pop-up photocall intervention titled Encaja_dos (meaning ‘to fit’ and read ‘within box’) where guests’ heads and torsos were photographed, well, within a box. These were placed on the walls of an empty lot in El Born, a section in the old part of Barcelona. Its popularity was such, that slowly over the year the lot had additions made to it, with gravel and seating added, becoming one of the most photographed corners of the city and recently included in official city tours. But Encaja_dos is no longer exclusive to Barcelona. Last month Las Magdalenas moved its next iteration to Rivas Vaciamadrid as part of the Cultural Festival in the Streets of Rivas. Taking new portraits of locals in white boxes, they then, with the assistance of many volunteers and friends, entered the waters clad in fisherman boots and pasted the photos along the white walls of the park, giving the impression of windows overlooking the banks. Add to that the reflective effect of the water, and the result is quite different from the original lot in El Born.

Keep an eye on these ladies. They are in full-steam-ahead mode, with new ideas and pop-ups every month. I wouldn’t be surprised if their work extended past the streets of Spain shortly.

The Sleep of the Beloved: Paul Schneggenburger

The Sleep of the Beloved, long exposure photos of sleeping couples, Paul SchneggenburgerThe Sleep of the Beloved, long exposure photos of sleeping couples, Paul SchneggenburgerThe Sleep of the Beloved, long exposure photos of sleeping couples, Paul SchneggenburgerClick to enlarge

Austrian photographer Paul Schneggenburger‘s university thesis project three years back, has since become an ongoing one. The Sleep of the Beloved is a series of photographs taken as one long-time exposure, from midnight to 6am, of lovers sleeping together. Schneggenburger sets up a bed in his studio apartment as a stage, complete with candlelight, but removes himself from the space as the couples sleep. The results are somewhat ghostlike, with a moody balletic quality. Quite nice, I think. If you’re interested in having you and your significant other photographed while sleeping together, there’s a contact on Schneggenburger’s website.

via dailymail

Linus Hui: Carton Animals

Linus Hui, Linus and the Feel Good Factory, Carton Animals, Costumes made from PaperLinus Hui, Linus and the Feel Good Factory, Carton Animals, Costumes made from PaperLinus Hui, Linus and the Feel Good Factory, Carton Animals, Costumes made from PaperClearly Em’s got Halloween on the brain, since this is the second costume-related link she’s sent me in the past few weeks. Though not intended as costumes, really, but rather a set of self-portraits by Hong Kong-based artist Linus Hui’s—who goes by the name Linus and the Feel Good FactoryCarton Animals definitely could inspire a creative do-it-yourself solution for that masquerade ball you’ve been invited to, or for your child’s trick-or-treating get-up. Hui creates his humorous paper costumes by using a big carton that he places over his head as the base, “breathing life into a mundane object.” These animal self-portraits are titled/narrated with puns and wordplay that can be seen in this book of the collection.

But Hui goes ‘outside of the box’ as well, with impressive paper costumes and masks, some a little more sinister than his animals. You can see those on his flickr and more Carton Animals here.

T. J. Wilcox: In the Air at the Whitney

In the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumIn the Air, A Panoramic Film Installation by T. J. Wilcox. 24hr day in NYC in 30 minutes. Whitney MuseumClick to enlarge

Currently, the second floor of the Whitney Museum is largely taken up by New York-based artist T. J. Wilcox‘s dramatic 360˚ panoramic film installation titled “In the Air”. The giant circular screen measuring roughly 7 feet high and 35 feet in diameter projects the span of a day in the city, from dawn to dusk, sped up to run in a 30-minute cycle. Inspired by the views from the roof of the building where he has his studio in Union Square, Wilcox filmed, or actually shot 60,000 stills, shot at the rate of one per second, and seamlessly patched together. Superimposed on this vista are six short films that loop, each with a NYC connection. From a documentary/portrait of the Empire State Building to Warhol inflating his silver helium balloons on the roof of his Factory, to Wilcox’s super recounting his personal witnessing of September 11 from that very roof.

I’m looking forward to seeing this exhibit soon—with my newly gifted membership—but, more interestingly, here is Wilcox speaking a bit on the work:

“In the Air” will be up at the Whitney through February 9, 2014.

Top photo by Fred R. Conrad for the NY Times; second photo courtesy of the Whitney; bottom three photos by Clare Henry.

Oded Hirsch: 50 Blue

Oded Hirsch, 50 Blue, Video and Stills, wheelchair lifted by pulley to see view, contemporary Israeli artOded Hirsch, 50 Blue, Video and Stills, wheelchair lifted by pulley to see view, contemporary Israeli artOded Hirsch, 50 Blue, Video and Stills, wheelchair lifted by pulley to see view, contemporary Israeli artClick to enlarge

Any time I’ve gone onto NYFA’s (New York Foundation for the Arts) website in the past month, I’ve been mesmerized by the looping 10-second video playing at the top of the page. In part it’s the visuals that are immediately intriguing; a man in a wheelchair being lifted via pulley up high over the water. Add to that the squeaky noise of the pulley, and it’s just hard not to be drawn in for several loops-worth of viewing. Turns out this is a shortened version of Israeli video artist Oded Hirsch’s 10-minute piece titled 50 Blue. After googling around I discovered through the New York Times that in the longer version, ”a young man struggles to push an older man in a wheelchair through a swampy landscape and down to the water’s edge. There, helpers in yellow slickers hoist the wheelchair up to an elevated platform. No one says a word, leaving us to wonder whether the view is worth the strenuous, muck-filled journey. Learning that the young man is Mr. Hirsch’s brother, and that the older one is his father, and that the site is the Sea of Galilee makes the whole thing seem like a parable.” So now, not only are the visuals and sounds captivating, but the story itself adds an equally engaging third dimension. You can see the video here.

via nyfa

From the CollabCubed Archives

We’re taking a little summer blogging break this month. To keep you entertained, we’ve put together easy access links to some of our more popular posts in the past months but, of course, feel free to peruse instead by category using the drop-down menu in the right sidebar, or click on the ‘random post’ icon also in the sidebar. There’s always our facebook page, as well, with links to all of our posts. And for those of you in NYC, please check out our recently launched site Culture on the Cheap offering daily suggestions of free and cheap events in New York City.

Enjoy and we’ll be back in a few weeks!

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Bence Bakonyi: Transform

Bence Bakonyi, Transform, contemporary Hungarian Photography, color, camouflageBence Bakonyi, Transform, contemporary Hungarian Photography, color, camouflageBence Bakonyi, Transform, contemporary Hungarian Photography, color, camouflageClick to enlarge

Hungarian photographer Bence Bakonyi camouflages others in his series of color-blocked photos titled Transform. From the artist:

How much is our environment forming our personality? How much can you prescind from its medium examining the individual? The photographs of Transform can be considered to be a straightforward commitment besides the inseparability of the individual and the environment. The impersonalized forms of the pictures are almost assimilating and fading into their backgrounds. These works are demonstrating this as an intentional conformism and not as an unconscious progress because only the external marks of the forms shaped consciously, i.e clothes are fading into the homogenous environment. The pieces of the series are describing the ability of people to fit in; they are demonstrating the phenomenon, by which the individual can identify himself/herself with the physical or mental medium. It takes and puts on the features of its environment, as a consequence of this it becomes a part of it.

Nice! If you like these you might also enjoy Liu Bolin’s  photographs,

via cosascool

Gus Petro: Merge

Gus Petro, contemporary photography, imagining NYC in Grand Canyon, Empty, Dense combined.Gus Petro, contemporary photography, imagining NYC in Grand Canyon, Empty, Dense combined.Gus Petro, contemporary photography, imagining NYC in Grand Canyon, Empty, Dense combined.Click to enlarge

Swiss photographer Gus Petro was impressed by NYC’s density and popularity as well as by the extreme emptiness and uninhabitable space of the Grand Canyon and Death Valley on his travels to the U.S. He took a series of photographs of New York titled Dense, another series titled Empty of the Grand Canyon, and then, to complete the trilogy, Petro merged the two in his aptly named series Merge. Exploring the polar opposites was interesting enough, but seeing what NYC would look like placed in the Grand Canyon is a surreal experience.

via mug

Ian Strange: Suburban

Suburban Interventions by Ian Strange (Kid Zoom), Street art on suburban homes, cool art interventions in suburbiaSuburban Interventions by Ian Strange (Kid Zoom), Street art on suburban homes, cool art interventions in suburbiaSuburban Interventions by Ian Strange (Kid Zoom), Street art on suburban homes, cool art interventions in suburbiaClick to enlarge

New York based Australian artist Ian Strange (aka Kid Zoom) has created a multifaceted photography, installation, and film project titled Suburban.

“… Since 2011 Strange worked with a film crew and volunteers in Ohio, Detroit, Alabama, New Jersey, New York and New Hampshire to create, photograph and film seven site specific interventions incorporating suburban homes. The recording of these interventions through film and photographic documentation forms the basis of this new body of work.”

SUBURBAN will premier in a solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria, Australia on July 26, 2013.

Photos & video courtesy of the artist.

via junkculture & designboom

Image 3D: Custom View-Master Reels

Image 3D, Personal View-Master Reel builder, Personalized view-master reels, fun gift, promo ideaImage 3D, Personal View-Master Reel builder, Personalized view-master reels, fun gift, promo ideaImage 3D, Personal View-Master Reel builder, Personalized view-master reels, fun gift, promo ideaThis is such a fun gift idea! Make-your-own view-master reels. Want to share your vacation photos in a more unique way? Or maybe a bunch of shots of you and your significant other in one reel complete with view-master would make a nice birthday or Valentine’s gift. Or, for all you designers/artists/architects out there… what a fun way to promote your work to potential clients. The first set (one reel, one viewer, all in a glossy white box) is $30 and it goes down from there per piece if you order more. Founded by Rich Dubnow, lead photographer at View-Master for twenty years, Image3D clearly should be the masters of view-masters.

via bblinks

Noriko Yamaguchi: Peppermint Girl/Mother

noriko yamaguchi, yamaguchi noriko, peppermint girl, peppermint mother, photos of women immersed in gumsticks, claymation videonoriko yamaguchi, yamaguchi noriko, peppermint girl, peppermint mother, photos of women immersed in gumsticks, claymation videonoriko yamaguchi, yamaguchi noriko, peppermint girl, peppermint mother, photos of women immersed in gumsticks, claymation videoClick to enlarge

Japanese artist Noriko Yamaguchi works in video animation, photography, illustration and performance art. Her art, rigorous in its form and composition, stems from intimate experiences, thoughts, and references to personal memories and cultural encounters. It concentrates on the human body and its relation to nature, tradition, social environment and technology. In her photographs and claymation video titled Peppermint Girls and Peppermint Mother, Yamaguchi’s imaginary characters are creatures borne from chewing gum. Her video, below, shows numerous living gumsticks moving around and covering every part of Yamaguchi’s body. All her works are self-portraits with the idea of transmutation of the human body.

via artnet

Every Subway Station in Manhattan

Every Subway Station in Manhattan, photo project by james doernberg and girlfriend kai jordan, took selfie at every subway stop in manhattan in one dayEvery Subway Station in Manhattan, photo project by james doernberg and girlfriend kai jordan, took selfie at every subway stop in manhattan in one dayEvery Subway Station in Manhattan, photo project by james doernberg and girlfriend kai jordan, took selfie at every subway stop in manhattan in one dayClick to enlarge

Everything about this one-day project by college students James Doernberg and Kai Jordan is super cute and fun. A few months back Doernberg was thinking of ways to make commuting fun/useful and it occurred to him that taking photos (“selfies”) of himself and girlfriend Jordan at every subway station in Manhattan would be one solution. So, on July 10th, after mapping out their route, the two set about the task. Mostly jumping out at each stop, snapping a photo with the subway station sign, and hopping back on the train before the doors closed, Doernberg and Jordan were able to photograph themselves at all 118 stations on the island in a total of nine hours. Certain subway lines as well as rush hour proved to be a little trickier with crowded platforms, so in those cases they sometimes ended up having to wait for the next train. It’s impressive how they were able to vary the shots quite a bit, considering the time restraints. You can see all 133 photos here, and read an interview with them here.

via gothamist

Twinkind: 3D-Printed Photo Figurines

Twinkind, Hamburg-based company that can 3D print photo portrait figurines quickly. 3D-printed portraits. Twinkind, Hamburg-based company that can 3D print photo portrait figurines quickly. 3D-printed portraits. Twinkind, Hamburg-based company that can 3D print photo portrait figurines quickly. 3D-printed portraits. Click to enlarge

Well, this is both fun and a little creepy. Hamburg-based company Twinkind creates 3D-printed photo figurines of you, your family, friends… or even your pet. These little photorealistic sculptures can range from 6 to 14 inches tall, are made of polymer plaster powder, and have optional bases in either oval or rectangular shape. What sets Twinkind apart from other 3D printing companies offering similar services is that they do the scanning in a fraction of the time. In fact, within seconds, allowing for re-dos or for the most impatient and fidgety people to stand still long enough for their own figurine. Starting at 225 euros for the smallest figurine, it’s not cheap, but if you’re ready layout the big bucks, just stop by Twinkind’s pop-up shop and they’ll guide you through the process. Looks like photo frames will soon be a thing of the past.

via the cool hunter

Street Stone: Léo Caillard & Alexi Persani

classic stone statues dressed in contemporary hip clothing, leo caillard photographer, Alexis Persani retoucherclassic stone statues dressed in contemporary hip clothing, leo caillard photographer, Alexis Persani retoucherclassic stone statues dressed in contemporary hip clothing, leo caillard photographer, Alexis Persani retoucherClick to enlarge

I’ve seen modern-day people dress up as classical statues both on Las Ramblas in Barcelona and, occasionally, here in NYC, but I’ve never seen classical statues dress up as modern-day people. French photographer Léo Caillard came up with the humorous concept. He didn’t actually dress these stone sculptures but instead had retoucher Alexis Persani masterly ‘enrobe’ them using photoshop, converting them into the most unassuming hipsters…well, maybe a little stiffer. How no one has come up with this concept before (talk about perfect models!) for a clothing company catalog (I can just see Victoria’s Secret’s Fall catalog now…) is a mystery to me. Very clever, Léo.

You can see the “making of” in the video below. Those are some mad skills (cue daughters’ eyerolls and cringing here.)

via radiolab

Chema Madoz: Virtual Reality

Chema Madoz, Surrealy photographs, Contemporary Spanish PhotographyChema Madoz, Surrealy photographs, Contemporary Spanish PhotographyChema Madoz, Surrealy photographs, Contemporary Spanish PhotographyClick to enlarge

Photographer Chema Madoz finds the surreal in the everyday. Not suprisingly Madoz is from Spain, where surrealism seems to run thick in the veins with predecessors like Dali and Buñuel setting a similar tone and sensibility years back. Madoz’s photographs make you do double-takes, with seemingly unrelated objects he fuses together in the most surprising ways that somehow make sense and often make you smile. All in black and white, with each one more clever than the next.

You can see many more of his photographs on his website.

via lost at e minor