Shelley Jackson: Snow Story

Shelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycShelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycShelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycIt’s been, and continues to be, a long and relentlessly snowy winter here in NYC this year, but Brooklyn-based author/illustrator Shelley Jackson is making the best of it. With admirable handwriting, Jackson has set out to writing a story in the snow—one word at a time—photographing each one and posting them to her instagram. Reading from oldest photo to newest, you can follow the ongoing story, waiting with bated breath for the next words to appear. Photos, it seems, are posted in relatively large batches roughly once a week, so maybe you can get a sentence or two in at a time. Story aside, the photos themselves are lovely, with great composition and a splash of color here and there. This is not the first time Shelley Jackson has taken to story-telling a word at a time; SKIN, a story published in tattoos on the skin of 2,095(!) volunteers is a previous project.

You can follow SNOW (in reverse order) over here, “weather permitting”, but from the looks of things outside, that shouldn’t be an issue…this could end up being a multi-volume story.

via gothamist via the awl

Fred Cray: Unique Photographs

Fred Cray, Unique Photographs, photos by the artist hidden all around the world to surprise. Janet Borden Gallery, Changing of the GuardFred Cray, Unique Photographs, photos by the artist hidden all around the world to surprise. Janet Borden Gallery, Changing of the GuardFred Cray, Unique Photographs, photos by the artist hidden all around the world to surprise. Janet Borden Gallery, Changing of the GuardPhotographer Fred Cray’s (previously here and here) latest exhibit at Janet Borden Gallery centers around his ongoing work titled Unique Photographs. It’s a fun idea that engages the public, distributing his unique artworks in the most unexpected places. But, really, who better to describe it than the photographer himself?

“This project is referred to as Unique Photographs which is also the title of the first overview book about the project. The second book, Changing the Guard, is a counter point to the first book and uses the same image double printed to make hundreds of unique print variations. The photographs have been hidden literally around the world with the intent of surprising people in pleasant ways, perhaps being kept as gifts. This should be an on-going project taking on new permutations for a number of years. The photographs have been stamped and numbered with holes being punched in the photographs recently to reinforce the notion of the photographs being unique objects.”

You have until February 21st to see the show at Janet Borden. Additionally, you can purchase both books here and here. And keep your eyes peeled for Fred’s unique photographs around your neighborhood. You never know where the next one might pop up…

Home Street Home: Le Projet FMR

Home Street Home, Le Projet FMR's street art exhibit in a Montpellier Villa pre-destruction, in FranceHome Street Home, Le Projet FMR's street art exhibit in a Montpellier Villa pre-destruction, in France. BMX, Levalet, Depose, Kashink, Leo & Pipo, Mme Moustache, Yuri Hopnn Home Street Home, Le Projet FMR's street art exhibit in a Montpellier Villa pre-destruction, in France. BMX, Levalet, Depose, Kashink, Leo & Pipo, Mme Moustache, Yuri Hopnn Last month, continuing in the tradition of converting pre-demolition or abandoned sites into an opportunity for a temporary street art show – Tour Paris 13, Rae’s Word of Mouth Bodega, and Surplus Candy being prime examples – Le Projet FMR organized the exhibition Home Street Home in a villa doomed to destruction in Montpellier, France. Coralie & Tom, former lawyers who started the project, had a week to set the place up with the help of local and international street artists. Some of these include: Mr. BMX’s bikes; Levalet and the incorporated cables; Baubô in the bathroom; Mme. Moustache; Yuri Hopnn; Stoul in the kitchen; Depose’s graffiti walls; and Souredj’s sculptural street art, to name just the ones in the photos above. Home Street Home was up and open to the public from January 17th through the 19th. You can see many more photos on Le Projet FMR’s website and facebook page, and you can get a virtual tour with some artist interviews in French in the video below:

via lustik

Blaqk: Greg Papagrigoriou & Simek

Blaqk Greg Papagrigoriou and Simek Athens street art, typography, calligraphy, black and whiteBlaqk Greg Papagrigoriou and Simek Athens street art, typography, calligraphy, black and whiteBlaqk Greg Papagrigoriou and Simek Athens street art, typography, calligraphy, black and whiteBlaqk is a collaboration between Athens-based design duo Greg Papagrigoriou and Chris Tzaferos who goes by Simek. Their street art mixes geometric forms with typographic letterforms—much of which is calligraphy. Whether black on white or white on black, on gallery walls, building façades, or abandon lots, their graphic style definitely pops. You can see much more of their work on their site.

via IdN

Piston Head: Cars into Sculpture

Piston Head: Artists engage the automobile, Miami Basel, Basel Miami 2014, Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf, Damien Hirst, Bruce High Quality, Contemporary art, carsPiston Head: Artists engage the automobile, Miami Basel, Basel Miami 2014, Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf, Damien Hirst, Bruce High Quality, Contemporary art, carsPiston Head: Artists engage the automobile, Miami Basel, Basel Miami 2014, Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf, Damien Hirst, Bruce High Quality, Contemporary art, carsLast month at Art Basel Miami, Venus Over Manhattan Gallery curated an exhibition titled Piston Head: Artists Engage the Automobile. Fourteen cars converted into sculptures by well-known contemporary artists since 1970 were on view at the spectacular open-air parking garage, 1111 Lincoln Road, designed by Herzog & deMeuron. The exhibit included works by Keith Haring (top), Damien Hirst (dotted Mini Cooper), Kenny Scharf (3rd from top), Ron Arad (pressed car), Bruce High Quality Foundation (VW Beetles), Franz West’s 1970 Rolls Royce, as well as eight more artists.

And here in an unrelated yet related (in that he’s drawing on a car) video is Jon Burgerman doing his thing on a zipcar:

Photos: HuffingtonPost and The Hundreds

via Venus Over Manhattan

Audra Hubbell: Letters at Large

Letters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyLetters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyLetters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyClick to enlarge

I love everything about Chicago-based designer Audra Hubbell‘s project Letters at Large. For starters, it’s type. Large type at that. Then the combination with architecture and the effect of each on the other is pretty fabulous. Somewhat reminiscent of Jenny Holzer’s Projections, but here it’s all about the one letter as opposed to text. Hubbell unleashes full-scale typography in public spaces as a visual research project exploring the interaction between projected large scale letterforms and the urban Chicago surroundings. Wouldn’t it be great if the poster set were available for purchase.

via behance

The Snails are Coming! The Snails are Coming!

ReGeneration PRoject, The Cracking Art Group, Giant Red Snails, Sculpture at the Rumsey Playfield in Central Park, Columbus Circle, and Eataly. Galleria Ca dOro andbVilla Firenze Foundation as presenting "Eight Giant Red Snails" as part of  the REgeneration Art Project. Red snails will inhabit Central Park from November 9 through December 3, 2013, before moving to Columbus Circle from December 5 to January 6, 2014. ReGeneration PRoject, The Cracking Art Group, Giant Red Snails, Sculpture at the Rumsey Playfield in Central Park, Columbus Circle, and Eataly. Galleria Ca dOro andbVilla Firenze Foundation as presenting "Eight Giant Red Snails" as part of  the REgeneration Art Project. Red snails will inhabit Central Park from November 9 through December 3, 2013, before moving to Columbus Circle from December 5 to January 6, 2014. ReGeneration PRoject, The Cracking Art Group, Giant Red Snails, Sculpture at the Rumsey Playfield in Central Park, Columbus Circle, and Eataly. Galleria Ca dOro andbVilla Firenze Foundation as presenting "Eight Giant Red Snails" as part of  the REgeneration Art Project. Red snails will inhabit Central Park from November 9 through December 3, 2013, before moving to Columbus Circle from December 5 to January 6, 2014. Click to enlarge

Well, actually, they’re already here. These eight foot snails are part of the REgeneration Art Project and are made of recyclable plastic obtained from landfills. The snails are a creation of the Cracking Art Group (previously here) consisting of six international artists whose intention is to change art history through both a strong social and environmental commitment, and a revolutionary and innovative use of different recyclable plastic materials. The snails were “living” at Rumsey Field in Central Park up until last week before moving (okay, they were more moved/transported than moving themselves) to Columbus Circle last week. You’re gonna have to trust me, they’re there. That’s where I spotted them earlier today, but no time for photo-taking. Apparently there’s at least one at Eataly on 23rd Street as well. These snails seem to keep with the scavenger hunt street art theme that has descended upon our city since the fall, first with Banksy, then Invader, and now, in a smaller, yet at the same time larger, scale, the invasion of the red snails.

The snails will be up at Columbus Circle through January 6th, 2014, so if you happen to be in the neighborhood, do keep an eye out for them.

Photos: Timothy Clary/AFP; Captain Kidder; Silverscreen Productions; gigi_nyc;

George Ferrandi: It Felt Like I Knew You…

George Ferrandi, It Felt Like I Knew You..., performance art, photography, street art intervention, Subway performance artGeorge Ferrandi, It Felt Like I Knew You..., performance art, photography, street art intervention, Subway performance artGeorge Ferrandi, It Felt Like I Knew You..., performance art, photography, street art intervention, Subway performance artClick to enlarge

For some, regularly dozing in moving vehicles and inadvertently leaning against random strangers while doing so, is a common occurrence (ahem…Em), but in the case of Brooklyn-based artist George Ferrandi, it’s completely intentional. For her ongoing project It Felt Like I Knew You Ferrandi rides the subway (her choice for these interventions because of its packed quality and the loneliness one can feel despite the physical intimacy) during rush hour and tests the limits of this shared confined area by reshaping the space between her body and a stranger’s sitting next to her.

I focus on the shape of the space between the person sitting next to me and myself. I attempt to mentally and emotionally re-sculpt that space. In my mind, I reshape it- from the stiff and guarded space between strangers to the soft and yielding space between friends. I direct all my energy to this space between us. When the space palpably changes, and I completely feel like the stranger sitting next to me is my friend, I rest my head on that person’s shoulder…

Ferrandi started the continuing project in 2012. The endearingly humorous results are documented by co-conspirator Angela Gilland on her phone. So, the next time you feel a woman’s head rest on your shoulder in the subway, it’s likely to be George Ferrandi…or, Em.

It Felt Like I Knew You can be seen at the Abrons Arts Center as part of the exhibit GUTS through the end of December.

via abrons arts center

Coloso: DOMA Collective

Coloso, giant robot-shaped electrical tower in Buenos Aires by Doma Collective for TecnopolisColoso, giant robot-shaped electrical tower in Buenos Aires by Doma Collective for TecnopolisColoso, giant robot-shaped electrical tower in Buenos Aires by Doma Collective for TecnopolisClick to enlarge

I’ve seen electrical towers disguised as unconvincing trees, but a colossal robot might be the more fun way to go. That’s just what Buenos Aires art collective Doma did for the Tecnopolis, a science and technology art fair in Villa Martelli, Argentina. The converted power tower was aptly named Coloso and its glowing neon hands, heart, and animated face add to the fun of the almost 148 ft tall artistic intervention. The luminous robot puts on quite a show at night highlighting its winking eyes and growing heart. Watch it in action below:

via graffitimundo

Benjamin Løzninger: C/Loud Project

Cloud Project by Benjamin Løzninger, street art, head in the clouds, photography, France, BrooklynCloud Project by Benjamin Løzninger, street art, head in the clouds, photography, France, BrooklynCloud Project by Benjamin Løzninger, street art, head in the clouds, photography, France, BrooklynClick to enlarge

French-born, and now Brooklyn-based, artist/designer/musician Benjamin Løzninger likes to merge digital storytelling with experimental branding. This past summer Løzninger’s C/Loud Project took to the streets of Paris and Brooklyn. With the idea of seeking refuge from some of life’s daily worries or the “dull bluntness of ocular reiteration,” the artist covered the sides of buildings, garage doors, billboards and more, with large digital prints of cloud-filled blue skies, subliminally suggesting a head-in-the-clouds effect. The hope is to provoke a smile, breath, or at a minimum a moment’s pause in the viewer’s day.

via musée

Mike Hewson: Deconstruction

Mike Hewson, The Crossing, Trompe l'oeil, Christchurch, New Zealand, street artMike Hewson, The Crossing, Trompe l'oeil, Christchurch, New Zealand, street artMike Hewson, The Crossing, Trompe l'oeil, Christchurch, New Zealand, street artClick to enlarge

New Zealand artist Mike Hewson (previously here) is playing with people’s minds again. This time the trompe l’oeil specialist has has covered an elevated walkway in Christchurch, NZ over its main thoroughfare, Colombo Street, with anamorphic large-scale digital prints of the two buildings connected by the walkway. When standing at a particular vantage point on the street below, the art visually deletes the overpass. When viewed from other spots the work looks distorted. Hewson’s objective in this post-earthquake affected area is to paradoxically reconstruct the site through a process of deconstruction, reflecting Christchurch’s recovery process of adding new development through the “deletion” of crumbled buildings.

via inhabitat

Hot Tea: Banksy Tribute & More

Hot Tea Yarn-bombing Banksy Tribute, East 4th St, NYC, BanksyNYC, street art, typographyHot Tea Yarn-bombing Banksy Tribute, East 4th St, NYC, BanksyNYC, street art, typographyHot Tea Yarn-bombing Banksy Tribute, East 4th St, NYC, BanksyNYC, street art, typographyClick to enlarge

Minneapolis-based street artist—and NYC frequenter—HOT TEA is known for his yarn-bombing typography, usually found on—but not limited to—chain link fences & telephone poles. Most often the words HOT TEA are geometrically spelled out, seemingly interlocked in three dimensions. I’ve run into several of his pieces over the past couple of years around NYC, one in Soho, another Nolita, and DUMBO as well. A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Banksy finished his month-long scavenger-hunt-like show Better Out Than In around the city, I came across a tribute to the reknowned street artist by, I assume, HOT TEA, though this speculation is based soley on style. The piece, which was on East 4th Street, was gone in less than 24 hours replaced with a real estate sign by the owners of the empty lot where the work stood. I’ve looked around to see if this Banksy tribute appeared anywhere online, including HOT TEA’s flickr, but so far nothing. Earlier in the fall, HOT TEA created his largest site specific piece to date with over 1600 knots and 800 pieces of yarn installed on the Williamsburg Bridge walkway. You can see the installation in the video below:

Top two photos: collabcubed. All others courtesy Hot Tea’s flickr.

Killy Kilford: Happy Signs

Happy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCHappy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCHappy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCHappy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCClick to enlarge

I’m all for things that surprise and delight, and that’s just what British artist Killy Kilford is up to since moving to NYC this past year. Feeling negativity from some of the city’s street signs, Kilford set out to create Happy Signs with upbeat messages and, with the help of volunteers, placed them under the official signs. “Honk Less, Love More” or “You Look Pretty Today” are just two examples of the many slogans aimed at getting a smile from his street audience. Kilford proposes that the city open a Dept of Well Being in addition to their standard agencies. He plans to use his project—currently 200 signs have been installed mostly around lower Manhattan and Williamsburg—to measure happiness using surveys and social media, with the ultimate goal of acting as a model for other cities to adopt a similar concept and their own department of well-being.

If you’re in New York City, keep your eyes peeled for the smile-inducing signage.

Photos courtesy of the artist and evgrieve

RAE: Word of Mouth Bodega

RAE street art, exhibit in East Village Bodega, Word of Mouth, Street Art, GraffitiRAE street art, exhibit in East Village Bodega, Word of Mouth, Street Art, GraffitiRAE street art, exhibit in East Village Bodega, Word of Mouth, Street Art, GraffitiRAE East Village Bodega covered in Street art, graffiti, Word of Mouth exhibitClick to enlarge

What if your corner bodega didn’t just sell milk, candy and cigarettes, but acted as an exhibit space for beautiful street art, inside and out? Cool, right? Well, that’s exactly what Brooklyn artist RAE has done in the East Village. Finding a former bodega that had to close due to flooding by Hurricane Sandy last year, RAE reopened the shop temporarily for his first solo NYC exhibit Word of Mouth. Covering most every surface in the place—including security cameras—with his drawings, and folky sculptures, the artist has the ‘gallery’ space operating as a functioning bodega as well.

A couple of years back, a friend pointed out RAE’s art on a sign at a now defunct fruit and vegetable stand in SoHo, so it seems that he has a longstanding fascination for the corner food vendor.

Word of Mouth will be on exhibit Thursdays through Saturdays until November 16, 2013, at the corner of East 12th Street and Avenue C.

Photos: changoblanco and vandalog

via vandalog & gothamist

Sambre: Wooden Sculptural Street Art

Street Art by Sambre, Le Mur XIII, Paris, Wooden Relief sculptural muralStreet Art by Sambre, Le Mur XIII, Paris, Wooden Relief sculptural muralStreet Art by Sambre, Le Mur XIII, Paris, Wooden Relief sculptural muralClick to enlarge

French street artist Sambre recently finished a new work at Le MUR XIII in Paris (looks to be a similar situation to NYC’s Bowery Mural with alternating artists’ works throughout the year) in the 13th arrondisement. Using found wood, the artist superimposed a sculptural piece with a protruding face at its center over the previous Le Mur XIII mural. Sambre had previously created an impressive installation in wood at Les Bains Douches (if you have a couple of minutes, check out the video below, it’s kind of amazing) this past summer, but this appears to be his first outdoor wooden piece.

Though (I’m pretty confident) not at all Sambre’s intention, this work seems fitting to post on the anniversary of Hurricane Sandy. It almost looks like the storm personified, down to the ripped apart boardwalks. To all who were affected, and the tough year they’ve been through, here’s to a better year ahead.

via graffuturism

Pro Bono Promo: Dori the Giant

Pro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyClick to enlarge

Recent photography grad Dori the Giant, aka Dorota Pankowska, created a street art series on the walls of downtown Brampton, Ontario titled Pro Bono Promo. She recreated logos using the product which they represent: the Colgate logo was illustrated in Colgate toothpaste; the Nutella one with Nutella…you get the idea. Then she also documented their (sometimes quick) deterioration, whether naturally or due to finger smudges. Which leads to the humorous title of the series. In many ways Pankowska gave these companies free advertising (pro bono) with free samples thrown in (promo). You can see a lot more of Pankowska’s clever work on her website and her blog.

If you like this, you might also enjoy Danielle Evans’ work.

via junkculture

Luis Gispert: Photos of Logo-clad Car Interiors

Luis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyLuis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyLuis Gispert, Photographs of car interiors decked out in haute coutour logo-clad decor, cool contemporary photographyClick to enlarge

Brooklyn-based artist/photographer Luis Gispert stumbled upon a culture of fashion-label customized car interiors that would be hard not to call impressive. These luxury brand knockoffs, or ‘interpretations’ according to Gispert, are created with the same obsession, fantasy, and dedication as an artist creates his/her art. Gispert’s series of photographs of these status-seeking automobiles (mostly owned by people of modest incomes who in many cases spent much more on the customization than the actual value of the final product) was compiled as a show titled “Decepción” at Mary Boone Gallery. From an Escalade covered in Murakami “LV” prints, to Stephen Sprouse’s bright green graffitti-scribbled version; a Burberry-lined Volkswagen to a pink Coach covered car; all artworks of sorts in their own right. The perfectly paired vistas from the windshields, however, are separate landscape photographs taken by Gispert and perfectly matched to emphasize the extremes between natural beauty and the questionable taste of our consumerist society.

You can see more of Gispert’s work on his website.

via musée

#Encaja_dos: Lagaleriademagdalena

Lagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridClick to enlarge

Las Magdalenas of Lagaleriademagdalena (previously here) have been at it again. Actually, they never stop. About a year ago the duo set up a pop-up photocall intervention titled Encaja_dos (meaning ‘to fit’ and read ‘within box’) where guests’ heads and torsos were photographed, well, within a box. These were placed on the walls of an empty lot in El Born, a section in the old part of Barcelona. Its popularity was such, that slowly over the year the lot had additions made to it, with gravel and seating added, becoming one of the most photographed corners of the city and recently included in official city tours. But Encaja_dos is no longer exclusive to Barcelona. Last month Las Magdalenas moved its next iteration to Rivas Vaciamadrid as part of the Cultural Festival in the Streets of Rivas. Taking new portraits of locals in white boxes, they then, with the assistance of many volunteers and friends, entered the waters clad in fisherman boots and pasted the photos along the white walls of the park, giving the impression of windows overlooking the banks. Add to that the reflective effect of the water, and the result is quite different from the original lot in El Born.

Keep an eye on these ladies. They are in full-steam-ahead mode, with new ideas and pop-ups every month. I wouldn’t be surprised if their work extended past the streets of Spain shortly.