Pro Bono Promo: Dori the Giant

Pro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyClick to enlarge

Recent photography grad Dori the Giant, aka Dorota Pankowska, created a street art series on the walls of downtown Brampton, Ontario titled Pro Bono Promo. She recreated logos using the product which they represent: the Colgate logo was illustrated in Colgate toothpaste; the Nutella one with Nutella…you get the idea. Then she also documented their (sometimes quick) deterioration, whether naturally or due to finger smudges. Which leads to the humorous title of the series. In many ways Pankowska gave these companies free advertising (pro bono) with free samples thrown in (promo). You can see a lot more of Pankowska’s clever work on her website and her blog.

If you like this, you might also enjoy Danielle Evans’ work.

via junkculture

LAb[au]: Signal to Noise

Cool type installation for Luminato Festival in Toronto; Signal to Noise by Lab[au] studio in Belgian with Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els VermangCool type installation for Luminato Festival in Toronto; Signal to Noise by Lab[au] studio in Belgian with Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els VermangCool type installation for Luminato Festival in Toronto; Signal to Noise by Lab[au] studio in Belgian with Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els VermangClick to enlarge

It doesn’t feel like that long ago that we’d hear the flapping noise of the information displays at most train stations and airports, yet quietly, and almost unnoticeably, they have mostly transitioned over to LED monitors. Belgian artist team LAb[au] consisting of Manuel Abendroth, Jérôme Decock and Els Vermang, created a playful type installation for Toronto’s Luminato Festival last year, utilizing the discarded technology and salvaged split-flaps from these old signage systems, arranged in a circular grid. Signal to Noise, as the piece is called, takes the random letters from the illegible and nonsensical into the legible and poetic, through its flipping mechanism. Apparently the sound is much subtler than in the video below; almost like rain. Best to see it in action:

Photos courtesy of LAb[au]

via canadian art junkie

Ole Martin Lund Bø: Anamorphic Type

Ole Martin Lund Bø, Anamorphic Typography Sculpture, Deceptive Outward AppearanceOle Martin Lund Bø, Anamorphic Typography Sculpture, Deceptive Outward AppearanceOle Martin Lund Bø, Anamorphic Typography Sculpture, Deceptive Outward AppearanceClick to enlarge

Finnish artist Ole Martin Lund Bø‘s wooden installation Deceptive Outward Appearance uses the technique of anamorphosis as we’ve seen also here and here. Even having seen other works utilizing the similar effect, I’m still always impressed at the ability to create these, as well as interested in the individual components that make up the whole. It’s just that one specific spot in the room that makes the words/image come into focus and go from gibberish, or abstraction, to a specific and clear message. Kind of the way I feel when I put on my reading glasses…

All images courtesy of the artist.

via étapes

Barbara Kruger: Belief+Doubt

Barbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtClick to enlarge

As part of an initiative to bring art to new sites within and around the Hirshhorn Museum, roughly a year ago the museum installed Barbara Kruger’s Belief+Doubt exhibit to fill the Lower Level lobby and extend into the newly relocated bookstore. The supersized words that have increasingly become Kruger’s trademark, create an environment that surrounds the viewer with language. The walls, floors, and escalators are all wrapped in text-printed vinyl that address themes of consumerism and power. I love when type takes over a space and choosing a highly-trafficked area that includes so many different angles with the stairs is particularly dramatic. The exhibit will continue through December 2014, so if you find yourself in Washington D.C. in the next year and a half, you might want to stop by the Hirshhorn to have a look in person.

Here it is being installed:

Photos by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the artist.

via juxtapozed

From the CollabCubed Archives

We’re taking a little summer blogging break this month. To keep you entertained, we’ve put together easy access links to some of our more popular posts in the past months but, of course, feel free to peruse instead by category using the drop-down menu in the right sidebar, or click on the ‘random post’ icon also in the sidebar. There’s always our facebook page, as well, with links to all of our posts. And for those of you in NYC, please check out our recently launched site Culture on the Cheap offering daily suggestions of free and cheap events in New York City.

Enjoy and we’ll be back in a few weeks!

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Food Typography: Danielle Evans

Food Typography, Type made with food, Danielle Evans project for Target's Food for thought campaignFood Typography, Type made with food, Danielle Evans project for Target's Food for thought campaignFood Typography, Type made with food, Danielle Evans project for Target's Food for thought campaignClick to enlarge

Midwestern designer Danielle Evans of Marmalade Bleue combines savoir-faire with natural materials such as tea, spices, flour or coffee, to create an amazing typographic series titled Food Typography. In collaboration with Target for their Food for Thought social media campaign announcing the opening of their Canadian stores, Evans created designs of phrases in both French and English using a myriad of food groups. Evans enjoys the organic quality to the process and quickly sees the bezier curves in the powder-y substances as well as the ephemeral and imperfect aspects of the medium. You can hear and see more about the project in the video below.

via swissmiss

40 Days of Dating: Walsh & Goodman

Jessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman, 40 Days of Dating, Typography, Experiment, Fun, Cute, Dating, FriendshipJessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman, 40 Days of Dating, Typography, Experiment, Fun, Cute, Dating, FriendshipJessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman, 40 Days of Dating, Typography, Experiment, Fun, Cute, Dating, FriendshipClick to enlarge

Part graphic-designer-online-reality-show, part experiment, part sociological/psychological art project, part super-clever-promo-piece, or whatever else you’d like to call it, Jessica Walsh (of Sagmeister & Walsh) and Timothy Goodman’s (previously here) 40 Days of Dating has Daniela and me completely hooked. Launched a few days ago (today is Day 5, so there’s not much catching up involved) the two good friends have opposite relationship problems—one an incurable romantic, the other has commitment issues—and are growing tired of the NYC dating life. Both single, they decided to embark on an adventure/experiment wherein they date each other exclusively (complying to a list of rules) for 40 days, answering a daily questionnaire that is revealed on the website, day by day. In addition, they enlisted an impressive slew of designers from their professional and personal circles to contribute daily typographic designs, beautifully illustrating the themes of the day.

It doesn’t hurt that both Walsh and Goodman are incredibly cute, talented, and appealing (plus we’re longtime fans) making the project that much more compelling, but there’s no doubt that under all it’s designy-ness and fun, 40 Days of Dating is a voyeuristic fest, complete with some cringe-inducing moments. Nonetheless, we’ve been totally drawn in, finding ourselves in daily discussions and speculating on what direction things will take. We’ve even piqued Em’s curiosity, so I’m sure she’ll be following soon.

They’ve also made a series of related videos that you can see here, and the behind-the-scenes one is below.

via coolhunting

Olson Office: Gensler

Cool Typographic Environmental Graphics and signage by Gensler for Olson, Minneapolis Cool Typographic Environmental Graphics and signage by Gensler for Olson, Minneapolis Cool Typographic Environmental Graphics and signage by Gensler for Olson, Minneapolis Click to enlarge

Rapidly expanding Olson, the largest advertising agency in Minneapolis, enlisted Gensler to design their 125,000 sq. ft. offices within Minneapolis’s historic Ford Center building, while maintaining the industrial character of the space. All elements were considered: from work flow to brand rooms to client-focused food and beverage service system. However, it is the treatment of the environmental graphics that I am focusing on here. They support and further the architectural concept, becoming an essential part of the design. Innovative use of super graphics enliven the building’s public spaces, yet continue to respect the building’s original character. The type treatment is bold, fun, and super creative, with giant floor numbers made out of colored string and nails, as just one example. The firm’s name is boldly and amorphously displayed on the ceiling of the top four floors creating an optical illusion, clearly read from the street looking up. The staircases and bathrooms continue with large painted signage and even the wall graphics and colorful furniture scream bold, assertive, and fun.

Photos by Pete Sieger

via segd

Rockaway Beach Signage: Pentagram

NYC Beaches - Signage   Location:  Rockaway Beach    Graphics:  Pentagram DesignNYC Beaches - Signage   Location:  Rockaway Beach    Graphics:  Pentagram DesignNYC Beaches - Signage   Location:  Rockaway Beach    Graphics:  Pentagram Design, Rockaway by Garrison ArchitectsClick to enlarge

A couple of weeks ago I went out to Rockaway Beach for the first time since last fall/winter when the post-Sandy ravaged beach looked like it would never quite bounce back with its boardwalk blown to bits, its playgrounds’ asphalt erupting like lava from a volcano, and the large parking lot near 105th St. practically invisible under the mounds of sand that had made its way two blocks in from the shore. But bounce back it has—though not quite 100%—clearly through an amazing amount of effort, work, and expense by countless numbers of people and organizations.

The boardwalk is still MIA but right away I noticed new, crisp signage clearly marking each beach name and street, as well as temporary concrete islands (designed by Sage and Coombe Architects) emblazoned with colorful supergraphics also displaying the corresponding beach numbers. Not surprisingly, I have since found out, perusing the Pentagram website, that the environmental graphics are the handy work of Paula Scher and her team of designers. Scher previously developed the identity and signage standards for the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, which manages and maintains the city’s beaches, and the beach graphics are an extension of that program, utilizing the logo but changing the fonts and colors.

In addition, the graphics have been applied to the mod ‘pods’ designed by Garrison Architects that contain the lifeguard and comfort stations . These look a little more futuristic and slick in the renderings than in reality, but in truth, they weren’t completely finished when I was there.

Impressive work all around, from clean-up, to graphics and architecture. By July 4th weekend it should all be in full-swing again, with many concession stands opening then. New Yorkers are a pretty invincible bunch.

Photos and renderings courtesy of Pentagram & Garrison Architects.

Paulius Nosokas: SPAMspace

SpamSpace by Paulius Nosokas, lines of spam converted to graph-like images and installations.SpamSpace by Paulius Nosokas, extracted lines of spam converted to graph-like images and installations.SpamSpace by Paulius Nosokas, extracted lines of spam converted to graph-like images and installations.Click to enlarge

Currently Berlin-based, Lithuanian-born artist Paulius Nosokas has a touching and inspiring childhood story, braving it independently from an early age and coming to the US at the age of 18 where he worked in, and learned on the job, graphic design and screen design. He combines these skills in his art being a firm believer that behind every good work of fine art is good design.

In his series of works titled SPAMspace, Nosokas collected 3-year’s worth of actual spam subject heads that appeared in his 5 email inboxes. He took a small fraction of them and designed them into stripes of color, dividing them into 7 sets — one for each day of the week — placing each line on its side, taking on a graph-like appearance. Together, they tell a story of the power of the written word to seduce, and become a clear representation of the internet and its invasion of privacy. Nosokas chose sexual spam, but could have just as easily  chosen non-sexual lines. SPAMspace is designed to fit in the space at hand, traveling up and across walls. I’d like to see this as a wallpaper selection. Maybe in the pastel tones of pink and blue. Maybe even in a baby’s room! Just kidding…

You might want to check out the rest of Paulius Nosokas’s work that ranges from light drawing to beautifully animated geometric shapes.

All photos courtesy of the artist.

Somos Luz: Boamistura

Boamistura, Panama City, Somos Luz, We are Light, Street Art, CommunityBoamistura, Panama City, Somos Luz, We are Light, Street Art, CommunityBoamistura, Panama City, Somos Luz, We are Light, Street Art, CommunityClick to enlarge

The folks of Boamistura (previously here & here) were at it again, doing what they do so well: fostering pride and community in impoverished neighborhoods with their street art interventions. Their latest participatory urban art project Somos Luz (We are Light) took place this past March in Panama City. Invited by the Panama Art Biennial and as part of their own Crossroads project, Boamistura enlisted the help of the inhabitants of the Begonia I building in El Chorrillo to paint the phrase “Somos Luz” on the façade of their building. Each apartment (50 total) was responsible for painting their own home including corridors and stairways. The concept was based on a color grid that, when seen from up close, looks like abstract shapes but, from a distance, spells out their proud bright message. It’s win-win all around. The building got a much needed coat of paint (see ‘before’ in third photo down from top.) The community, down to the young children, were included in the project. And a sense of well-deserved pride was instilled in all who live in the Begonia I building. Nice work as usual Boamistura!

Wellington Writers Walk

Wellington Writers Walk is a typography filled waterfront park in New Zealand, Catherine Griffiths and Fiona ChristellerWellington Writers Walk is a typography filled waterfront park in New Zealand, Catherine Griffiths and Fiona ChristellerWellington Writers Walk is a typography filled waterfront park in New Zealand, Catherine Griffiths and Fiona ChristellerTypography in architecture, Fiona Christeller, Wellington Writers WalkClick to enlarge

Though built about ten years ago, I don’t think I’ve ever come across the type-filled Wellington Writers Walk before. A project of the New Zealand Society of Authors, the waterfront park is full of bold concrete plaques and more subtle “benchmarks” emblazoned with 19 quotations from some of New Zealand’s best known writers, both past and present. The plaques have been designed by renowned typographer Catherine Griffiths and the benchmarks (some actual seats) by Wellington architect Fiona Christeller. Pretty impressive architypeture.

Photos courtesy Wellington Writers Walk; Catherine Griffiths; Bruce Connew; and Jason Busch.

via LetterScapes by Anna Saccani

Swissted: Mike Joyce

Swissted, Mike Joyce, Graphic Design, typography,Redesigning old punk, hardcore, and indie rock show flyers into Swiss modern postersSwissted, Mike Joyce, Graphic Design, typography,Redesigning old punk, hardcore, and indie rock show flyers into Swiss modern postersSwissted, Mike Joyce, Graphic Design, typography,Redesigning old punk, hardcore, and indie rock show flyers into Swiss modern postersClick to enlarge

These are fabulous! Swissted is an ongoing project by NYC-based graphic designer Mike Joyce who owns Stereotype Design. Joyce has combined his love of music and Swiss modernism in this series of redesigned vintage punk, hardcore, new wave, and indie rock show flyers that delightfully play with type and color in the style of vintage Swiss posters from the 1950s and 60s emphasizing cleanliness and readability. One would think that the mix wouldn’t necessarily work, but as is evident above and in Mike Joyce’s recently released book of the same name, Swissted blends beautifully. Here’s Joyce’s thinking as told to mentalfloss:

“Punk has an anti-establishment ethos and Swiss modernism is very structured. But at the same time there’s a common thread between the two—the Swiss modernists purged extraneous decoration to create clear communication, while punk rock took on self-indulgent rock and roll and stripped it to its core. So I thought it would be an interesting study to combine the two and see what happened.”

There are many more to see over on the Swissted site…I had a very hard time limiting myself to the ones above.

Pae White: Typography Yarn Installation

Cool Typography Installation using 48km of thread by Pae White at South London GalleryCool Typography Installation using 48km of thread by Pae White at South London GalleryCool Typography Installation using 48km of thread by Pae White at South London GalleryClick to enlarge

Los Angeles artist Pae White creates site specific installations merging art, design, and architecture. Presently at the South London Gallery you can find her latest installation titled Too Much Night, Again where 48km of yarn is interwoven and criss-crossed into connecting supergraphic letterforms spelling out the words “Unmattering” on one wall and “Tiger Time” on the opposite one. The work was inspired by a period of insomnia which is hinted at in its name. Depending on your location within the space, the words emerge and fade. Pretty spectacular.

You can see the exhibit being mounted in the video below as well as White being interviewed about her process. And if you’re in London before May 12th, you can see it at the South London Gallery.

Photos courtesy greengrassi by Andy Keate.

via it’s nice that

Filament Mind: Teton County Library

Filament Mind, data visualization installation at Teton County Library, Wyoming, by E/B Office, information graphics, optical fibreFilament Mind, data visualization installation at Teton County Library, Wyoming, by E/B Office, information graphics, optical fibreFilament Mind, data visualization installation at Teton County Library, Wyoming, by E/B Office, information graphics, optical fibreClick to enlarge

Filament Mind is an information-driven installation at the Teton County Library in Wyoming, designed to visualize the collective questions of library visitors through an interactive and dynamic spacial sculpture. Designed by Brian W. Brush and Yong Ju Lee of E/B office, Filament Mind illuminates searches in a flash of color and light through glowing bundles of fiber optic cables. Whenever any Wyoming public library visitor anywhere in the state performs a search of the library catalog from a computer, each of the 1000 fiber optic cables hanging above (totaling over 5 miles of cable) corresponds to a call number in the Dewey Decimal System, which organizes the library’s collection into approximately 1000 categories of knowledge. These category titles are displayed in text on the lobby’s south and north walls at the termination points of the fiber optic cables. For further clarification how the installation works watch the video below:

via onesmallseed

Jay Shells: Rap Quotes

The Rap Quotes a street art project by Jay Shells, Street signs with rap quotes with locations, placed at their locations.. The Rap Quotes a street art project by Jay Shells, Street signs with rap quotes with locations, placed at their locations.. The Rap Quotes a street art project by Jay Shells, Street signs with rap quotes with locations, placed at their locations.. Click to enlarge

I don’t pretend to know much about rap and even used to refer to Busta Rhymes as Buster (yeah, I know…) but I got a kick out of this project: Graphic artist Jay Shells brought together his love of rap and his keen sign-making abilities in his street art project titled The Rap Quotes. He made 30 official-looking street signs with rap lyrics that cite specific locations and posted the signs at those very locations. Everyone from Mos Def to GZA, Puff Daddy to Kanye West, and more are quoted.

I have to give a nod to a friend who had another rap lyric-related project idea a while back that we briefly worked on together: rap tees. Who knows? Could still happen…

You can follow @TheRapQuotes for more on Shells’ project.

via gothamist and animal

Morag Myerscough: Environmental Graphics

Studio Myerscough, Fun, colorful, type-filled environmental graphics and wayfinding systems. Morag myerscough, supergroupStudio Myerscough, Fun, colorful, type-filled environmental graphics and wayfinding systems. Morag myerscough, supergroupMorag Myerscough, Studio Myerscough, Typography, fun environmental graphics, bold colored type muralsClick to enlarge

English designer Morag Myerscough creates environmental graphics combining a great sense of color with a great sense of typography; what could be better? Having started Studio Myerscough in 1993, the studio has collaborated with important architects and worked on spaces that range from museum exhibitions to five children’s dining rooms for the new Barts and The Royal London Children’s Hospital (four of which can be seen in the top four photos.) All of Myerscough’s work exudes happiness and fun, which seems like the perfect combination to bring a little joy to a children’s hospital. There’s much more to see on Studio Myerscough’s website as well as over on the Supergroup site.

via étapes