Shelley Jackson: Snow Story

Shelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycShelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycShelley Jackson writes words in the snow to create a story on instagram, typography in snow, nycIt’s been, and continues to be, a long and relentlessly snowy winter here in NYC this year, but Brooklyn-based author/illustrator Shelley Jackson is making the best of it. With admirable handwriting, Jackson has set out to writing a story in the snow—one word at a time—photographing each one and posting them to her instagram. Reading from oldest photo to newest, you can follow the ongoing story, waiting with bated breath for the next words to appear. Photos, it seems, are posted in relatively large batches roughly once a week, so maybe you can get a sentence or two in at a time. Story aside, the photos themselves are lovely, with great composition and a splash of color here and there. This is not the first time Shelley Jackson has taken to story-telling a word at a time; SKIN, a story published in tattoos on the skin of 2,095(!) volunteers is a previous project.

You can follow SNOW (in reverse order) over here, “weather permitting”, but from the looks of things outside, that shouldn’t be an issue…this could end up being a multi-volume story.

via gothamist via the awl

Home Street Home: Le Projet FMR

Home Street Home, Le Projet FMR's street art exhibit in a Montpellier Villa pre-destruction, in FranceHome Street Home, Le Projet FMR's street art exhibit in a Montpellier Villa pre-destruction, in France. BMX, Levalet, Depose, Kashink, Leo & Pipo, Mme Moustache, Yuri Hopnn Home Street Home, Le Projet FMR's street art exhibit in a Montpellier Villa pre-destruction, in France. BMX, Levalet, Depose, Kashink, Leo & Pipo, Mme Moustache, Yuri Hopnn Last month, continuing in the tradition of converting pre-demolition or abandoned sites into an opportunity for a temporary street art show – Tour Paris 13, Rae’s Word of Mouth Bodega, and Surplus Candy being prime examples – Le Projet FMR organized the exhibition Home Street Home in a villa doomed to destruction in Montpellier, France. Coralie & Tom, former lawyers who started the project, had a week to set the place up with the help of local and international street artists. Some of these include: Mr. BMX’s bikes; Levalet and the incorporated cables; Baubô in the bathroom; Mme. Moustache; Yuri Hopnn; Stoul in the kitchen; Depose’s graffiti walls; and Souredj’s sculptural street art, to name just the ones in the photos above. Home Street Home was up and open to the public from January 17th through the 19th. You can see many more photos on Le Projet FMR’s website and facebook page, and you can get a virtual tour with some artist interviews in French in the video below:

via lustik

Onion Skin: Olivier Ratsi

Olivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi's Onion Skin, audio-visual immersive installation, time and space through perspective gameOlivier Ratsi is a French visual artist whose work is mainly based upon representations of space’s perception and the experience of reality. His audiovisual immersive installation, Onion Skin, offers the viewer a changing perspective of space and time. Consisting of two walls set up perpendicular to each other and serving as canvases on which a series of animated geometric shapes are projected—along with sound—a new dimension is slowly revealed. Using repetition and scale, the anamorphic visuals play tricks on the viewer, having what initially seemed flat, suddenly delineate a new space, consequently altering their perception of depth all the while having a hypnotic effect. The illusion appears as the “onion skins” seem to peel away and leave their physical surface behind. Here’s a video:

via rooms magazine

NONEON: Fabian Thiele

Noneon, recycled sign letters converted into lights by Fabian Thiele. FrankfurtNoneon, recycled sign letters converted into lights by Fabian Thiele. FrankfurtNoneon, recycled sign letters converted into lights by Fabian Thiele. FrankfurtI certainly know where I’ll be headed if I find myself in Frankfurt. NONEON is a small shop/gallery run by designer Fabian Thiele who has been collecting letters from old signs and fixing them up, making them into lights, all, apparently, affordable to boot. Just seeing these piles of illuminated type makes me happy. The shop is only open on Fridays and Saturdays so, if this appeals to you next time in Frankfurt, make sure to plan accordingly. Recycling at its best.

via luminapolis

Blaqk: Greg Papagrigoriou & Simek

Blaqk Greg Papagrigoriou and Simek Athens street art, typography, calligraphy, black and whiteBlaqk Greg Papagrigoriou and Simek Athens street art, typography, calligraphy, black and whiteBlaqk Greg Papagrigoriou and Simek Athens street art, typography, calligraphy, black and whiteBlaqk is a collaboration between Athens-based design duo Greg Papagrigoriou and Chris Tzaferos who goes by Simek. Their street art mixes geometric forms with typographic letterforms—much of which is calligraphy. Whether black on white or white on black, on gallery walls, building façades, or abandon lots, their graphic style definitely pops. You can see much more of their work on their site.

via IdN

Audra Hubbell: Letters at Large

Letters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyLetters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyLetters at Large by Audra Hubbell, Large projections of letters with cool effects against architecture. Photographs. TypographyClick to enlarge

I love everything about Chicago-based designer Audra Hubbell‘s project Letters at Large. For starters, it’s type. Large type at that. Then the combination with architecture and the effect of each on the other is pretty fabulous. Somewhat reminiscent of Jenny Holzer’s Projections, but here it’s all about the one letter as opposed to text. Hubbell unleashes full-scale typography in public spaces as a visual research project exploring the interaction between projected large scale letterforms and the urban Chicago surroundings. Wouldn’t it be great if the poster set were available for purchase.

via behance

Pammy Pea by Pamella Lessero

Pammy Pea Children's Book on eating healthy, nutrition, by Pamella LesseroPammy Pea Children's Book on eating healthy, nutrition, by Pamella LesseroPammy Pea Children's Book on eating healthy, nutrition, by Pamella LesseroClick to enlarge

Our friend—as well as local NYC artist and lifelong vegetable lover—Pam Lessero just published a fun and friendly educational illustrated book for kids which focuses on the importance of eating healthy. The book’s protagonist (and Pamella’s alter ego?) Pammy Pea, “…wants to inspire and teach children everywhere to be healthy and eat all of their vegetables. When she is not dreaming of landing on your plate, you can find her happealy rolling around the garden with all her pea family and friends.”  Pammy Pea is targeted at the 3 to 6-year-old set and can be purchased over here. Stickers are available too, and a plush toy of Pammy Pea herself will follow shortly. You can follow Pammy Pea on facebook for updates too.

Mégaphone: Moment Factory

interactive led type facade, Montreal, Megaphone by Moment Factory, typographyinteractive led type facade, Montreal, Megaphone by Moment Factory, typographyinteractive led type facade, Montreal, Megaphone by Moment Factory, typographyClick to enlarge

This past fall, up until last month, Mégaphone, an interactive installation, occupied the Promenade des Artistes, in the heart of Quartier des Spectacles in Montreal with the intention of reappropriating public space. The installation, designed by Moment Factory, invited visitors to gather and explore the fun side to public speaking. Using a megaphone participants could speak out, their words transformed in real time into images projected onto the façade of the University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM), leaving their visual “footprint” on the urban landscape. Inspired by the city’s early 20th-century history of popular assemblies as well as the 19th-century British tradition of the Speaker’s Corner, the installation gives everyone a chance to speak out and air their concerns. Visual effects of waves, scribbles, and distortions were generated by voice recognition software designed by the Computer Research Institute of Montreal. Certainly a crowd pleaser for all ages as seen in the video below:

via eg

Moving Icon: Kalhöfer-Korschildgen

Moving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryMoving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryMoving Icon Pop-Up Pavilion in Westphalia, Germany by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen. Pavilion communicates HistoryClick to enlarge

Moving Icon is a mobile pop-up pavilion designed by Cologne-based Kalhöfer-Korschildgen that travels around the Westphalian region of Germany providing its visitors with information on local architectural history. The compact house-like mini-museum attaches to the back of a car and, with the click of a remote control, literally ‘pops’ open transforming into a lovely illuminated pavilion. The exhibit includes both analogue and digital displays and incorporates typography into its structure and signage in a clever and designy manner. The display is interactive and can be customized for any location.

Photos by Jörg Hempel

Hot Tea: Banksy Tribute & More

Hot Tea Yarn-bombing Banksy Tribute, East 4th St, NYC, BanksyNYC, street art, typographyHot Tea Yarn-bombing Banksy Tribute, East 4th St, NYC, BanksyNYC, street art, typographyHot Tea Yarn-bombing Banksy Tribute, East 4th St, NYC, BanksyNYC, street art, typographyClick to enlarge

Minneapolis-based street artist—and NYC frequenter—HOT TEA is known for his yarn-bombing typography, usually found on—but not limited to—chain link fences & telephone poles. Most often the words HOT TEA are geometrically spelled out, seemingly interlocked in three dimensions. I’ve run into several of his pieces over the past couple of years around NYC, one in Soho, another Nolita, and DUMBO as well. A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Banksy finished his month-long scavenger-hunt-like show Better Out Than In around the city, I came across a tribute to the reknowned street artist by, I assume, HOT TEA, though this speculation is based soley on style. The piece, which was on East 4th Street, was gone in less than 24 hours replaced with a real estate sign by the owners of the empty lot where the work stood. I’ve looked around to see if this Banksy tribute appeared anywhere online, including HOT TEA’s flickr, but so far nothing. Earlier in the fall, HOT TEA created his largest site specific piece to date with over 1600 knots and 800 pieces of yarn installed on the Williamsburg Bridge walkway. You can see the installation in the video below:

Top two photos: collabcubed. All others courtesy Hot Tea’s flickr.

Killy Kilford: Happy Signs

Happy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCHappy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCHappy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCHappy Signs, Killy Kilford, Department of Well Being, Dept of Well Being, Street Art that makes people smile, NYCClick to enlarge

I’m all for things that surprise and delight, and that’s just what British artist Killy Kilford is up to since moving to NYC this past year. Feeling negativity from some of the city’s street signs, Kilford set out to create Happy Signs with upbeat messages and, with the help of volunteers, placed them under the official signs. “Honk Less, Love More” or “You Look Pretty Today” are just two examples of the many slogans aimed at getting a smile from his street audience. Kilford proposes that the city open a Dept of Well Being in addition to their standard agencies. He plans to use his project—currently 200 signs have been installed mostly around lower Manhattan and Williamsburg—to measure happiness using surveys and social media, with the ultimate goal of acting as a model for other cities to adopt a similar concept and their own department of well-being.

If you’re in New York City, keep your eyes peeled for the smile-inducing signage.

Photos courtesy of the artist and evgrieve

RAE: Word of Mouth Bodega

RAE street art, exhibit in East Village Bodega, Word of Mouth, Street Art, GraffitiRAE street art, exhibit in East Village Bodega, Word of Mouth, Street Art, GraffitiRAE street art, exhibit in East Village Bodega, Word of Mouth, Street Art, GraffitiRAE East Village Bodega covered in Street art, graffiti, Word of Mouth exhibitClick to enlarge

What if your corner bodega didn’t just sell milk, candy and cigarettes, but acted as an exhibit space for beautiful street art, inside and out? Cool, right? Well, that’s exactly what Brooklyn artist RAE has done in the East Village. Finding a former bodega that had to close due to flooding by Hurricane Sandy last year, RAE reopened the shop temporarily for his first solo NYC exhibit Word of Mouth. Covering most every surface in the place—including security cameras—with his drawings, and folky sculptures, the artist has the ‘gallery’ space operating as a functioning bodega as well.

A couple of years back, a friend pointed out RAE’s art on a sign at a now defunct fruit and vegetable stand in SoHo, so it seems that he has a longstanding fascination for the corner food vendor.

Word of Mouth will be on exhibit Thursdays through Saturdays until November 16, 2013, at the corner of East 12th Street and Avenue C.

Photos: changoblanco and vandalog

via vandalog & gothamist

Pro Bono Promo: Dori the Giant

Pro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyPro Bono Promo, Dorota Pankowska, Street art Logos created from the product they represent, dori the giant, typographyClick to enlarge

Recent photography grad Dori the Giant, aka Dorota Pankowska, created a street art series on the walls of downtown Brampton, Ontario titled Pro Bono Promo. She recreated logos using the product which they represent: the Colgate logo was illustrated in Colgate toothpaste; the Nutella one with Nutella…you get the idea. Then she also documented their (sometimes quick) deterioration, whether naturally or due to finger smudges. Which leads to the humorous title of the series. In many ways Pankowska gave these companies free advertising (pro bono) with free samples thrown in (promo). You can see a lot more of Pankowska’s clever work on her website and her blog.

If you like this, you might also enjoy Danielle Evans’ work.

via junkculture

#Encaja_dos: Lagaleriademagdalena

Lagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridLagaleriademagdalena, Spanish Street art, #Encaja_dos, photocall pop-ups in Barcelona and Rivas VaciamadridClick to enlarge

Las Magdalenas of Lagaleriademagdalena (previously here) have been at it again. Actually, they never stop. About a year ago the duo set up a pop-up photocall intervention titled Encaja_dos (meaning ‘to fit’ and read ‘within box’) where guests’ heads and torsos were photographed, well, within a box. These were placed on the walls of an empty lot in El Born, a section in the old part of Barcelona. Its popularity was such, that slowly over the year the lot had additions made to it, with gravel and seating added, becoming one of the most photographed corners of the city and recently included in official city tours. But Encaja_dos is no longer exclusive to Barcelona. Last month Las Magdalenas moved its next iteration to Rivas Vaciamadrid as part of the Cultural Festival in the Streets of Rivas. Taking new portraits of locals in white boxes, they then, with the assistance of many volunteers and friends, entered the waters clad in fisherman boots and pasted the photos along the white walls of the park, giving the impression of windows overlooking the banks. Add to that the reflective effect of the water, and the result is quite different from the original lot in El Born.

Keep an eye on these ladies. They are in full-steam-ahead mode, with new ideas and pop-ups every month. I wouldn’t be surprised if their work extended past the streets of Spain shortly.

Fos: Rayen Restaurant Installation

Fos, Somos Fos, Rayen Restaurant Madrid, facade painted to look like light, fun installation/artFos, Somos Fos, Rayen Restaurant Madrid, facade painted to look like light, fun installation/artFos, Somos Fos, Rayen Restaurant Madrid, facade painted to look like light, fun installation/artFos, Somos Fos, Rayen Restaurant Madrid, facade painted to look like light, fun installation/artClick to enlarge

(fos) the multidisciplinary trio based in Madrid and Barcelona, is made up of Eleni Karpatsi, Susana Piquer, and Julio Calvo. The architecture/interior design/graphic design firm recently “illuminated” the façade of vegan restaurant Rayen in Madrid by painting a bright yellow beam of light emanating from an industrial lamp over the entrance. The playful treatment had a show-stopping effect on passers-by, which (fos) clearly anticipated, setting up a photo-shooting spot across the street with a camera icon made of tape placed on the sidewalk for the optimum shot. The whole project is clever, fun, definitely eye-catching for the restaurant and, if that weren’t enough, a great representation of their own firm’s name, as well. Fos means light in Greek and melted in Catalan. So there’s that…

via jeroen apers

Tour Paris 13: The Paris Tower Project

Tour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceTour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceTour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceTour Paris 13, The Paris 13 Tower Project, Largest Group Street Art Exhibit Ever, Apartment building painted inside and out by around 100 international street artists, Galerie ItinerranceClick to enlarge

October has commenced and Street Art is in the air, or, more accurately on the walls. Here in NYC, Banksy has started stenciling the city with his Better Out Than In project, with possibly a work per day, with a phone number you can call to get an in-depth tongue-in-cheek guided tour to each piece.

Meanwhile, in Paris, Tour Paris 13 (Paris Tower Project 13) has launched. Touted as the “largest group Street Art exhibition ever carried out,” a tower in the 13th Arrondissement slated for demolition at the end of the year has been enshrined by over one hundred artists from all over the world before its destruction. Each artist was given a space, wall, apartment, ceiling to create their work on, inside and out the 4,500 sq meter edifice. With the support of City Hall, ICF Habitat La Sabliere, and Galerie Itinerrance, the project remained secret for many months. The list of artists is impressive, and way too extensive to include here…but some names include: Ludo, El Seed, Legz, Sean Hart, Sumo, and Vhils, just to name a very few.

The exhibit will be up for the entire month of October, and then the building will close and prepare for demolition. For anyone that can’t make it to Paris by then, the website is impressively comprehensive and immersive, taking you room by room and floor by floor with 360˚ views.

Here’s a teaser video from galerie Itinerrance:

Topographic Rest Stops: Büro Uebele

Colorful topographic Rest stop bathrooms in Saxony Germany by Büro Uebele, Motorway Toilets, Map-clad reststopsColorful topographic Rest stop bathrooms in Saxony Germany by Büro Uebele, Motorway Toilets, Map-clad reststopsColorful topographic Rest stop bathrooms in Saxony Germany by Büro Uebele, Motorway Toilets, Map-clad reststopsStuttgart-based visual communications firm Büro Uebele (previously here) has designed a series of colorful rest stops/motorway toilets for the Lower Saxony region of Germany. These bright objects that seemingly glow by the roadside, not only relieve the monotony of the highway landscape, but do so using topographic maps of the area that have been digitized, assigning different colors to the varying altitudes of that specific location. The results are cheerful, abstract-looking patterned façades that would deter the best of graffiti artists.

Photos by Christian Richters, courtesy of Büro Uebele.

via segd

Barbara Kruger: Belief+Doubt

Barbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtBarbara Kruger, Typography Installation, Hirshhorn Museum lower lobby and escalator, Belief and DoubtClick to enlarge

As part of an initiative to bring art to new sites within and around the Hirshhorn Museum, roughly a year ago the museum installed Barbara Kruger’s Belief+Doubt exhibit to fill the Lower Level lobby and extend into the newly relocated bookstore. The supersized words that have increasingly become Kruger’s trademark, create an environment that surrounds the viewer with language. The walls, floors, and escalators are all wrapped in text-printed vinyl that address themes of consumerism and power. I love when type takes over a space and choosing a highly-trafficked area that includes so many different angles with the stairs is particularly dramatic. The exhibit will continue through December 2014, so if you find yourself in Washington D.C. in the next year and a half, you might want to stop by the Hirshhorn to have a look in person.

Here it is being installed:

Photos by Cathy Carver, courtesy of the artist.

via juxtapozed