Jello Brick Wall: Hein & Seng

Jell-O Brick Wall, Jello Brick Wall by Lisa Hein and Robert Seng. Contemporary Sculpture. Seattle and Exit Art NYC. Cool art, fun art, goofy art. Food artJell-O Brick Wall, Jello Brick Wall by Lisa Hein and Robert Seng. Contemporary Sculpture. Seattle and Exit Art NYC. Cool art, fun art, goofy art. Food artJell-O Brick Wall, Jello Brick Wall by Lisa Hein and Robert Seng. Contemporary Sculpture. Seattle and Exit Art NYC. Cool art, fun art, goofy art. Food artArtists Bob Seng and Lisa Hein have created their Jello Brick Wall sculptures on more than one occasion. Their most recent was at the Seattle Center in, well, Seattle. The jiggly installation consisted of 500 lbs. of Jell-O made into loaf-size bricks of varying flavors (raspberry, orange, cherry, lime, and more) and colors held in place with gypsum mortar. The artists cook the Jell-O on a hot plate and cool it in molds in a fridge. The final wall measured roughly 5 feet in height and 12 feet in length. And then there’s the melting/deteriorating aspect. Hein and Seng like the temporary nature of the work. Each brick apparently has the approximate lifespan of cut flowers, eventually melting or crumbling leaving just the mortar. The work is part performance, part installation. You can see more in the video below:

via nyfa

 

Chanel Shopping Center: Paris Fashion Week

Chanel Shopping Center, Paris Fashion Week 2014, Karl Lagerfeld, Supermarket with all Chanel labeled food in grand Palais for displaying Chanel runway collectionChanel Shopping Center, Paris Fashion Week 2014, Karl Lagerfeld, Supermarket with all Chanel labeled food in grand Palais for displaying Chanel runway collectionChanel Shopping Center, Paris Fashion Week 2014, Karl Lagerfeld, Supermarket with all Chanel labeled food in grand Palais for displaying Chanel runway collectionFashion shows keep pushing the boundaries and blurring the lines between art, performance, design and fashion. Last week in Paris, Karl Lagerfeld and his Chanel team took their Fall 2014 runway show to a whole new level. Stepping into the Grand Palais, all attendees were welcomed by the over-the-top Chanel Shopping Center. An entire supermarket recreated with every item rebranded/repackaged and emblazoned with the highly recognizable interlocking C’s of the Chanel logo. From every food product you can imagine, to cleaning products, welcome mats, brooms, soap, garbage bags and much more. The models walked through the runway aisles clad in the new Fall line, all wearing sneakers (because you can wear a Chanel suit to pick up your groceries, but heels might be too much?) pushing grocery carts or carrying baskets. An impressive feat, which apart from the obvious wow-factor, was meant to be a commentary on the state of consumerism. You’ll be relieved to know that all of the items are being donated to charity. It is difficult to wrap one’s head around all the design, printing, and organization that clearly went into this event, in addition to the fashion line itself. It’s the ultimate mega pop-up shop/installation… it’ll be tough to top.

Here’s a video of the models strutting their wares:

Photos: Garance Doré; and Marcando Tendencia

via Garance Doré

Icepop Generator: MELT

Icepop Generator concept by MELT. 3D printed icepops. Self-portrait icepopsIcepop Generator concept by MELT. 3D printed icepops. Self-portrait icepopsIcepop Generator concept by MELT. 3D printed icepops. Self-portrait icepopsIt was only a matter of time before 3D printing turned to food, or vice versa. There have been some spectacularly beautiful pieces (actually, too beautiful to put in your coffee!) made with sugar, and now there is talk of Hershey teaming up with 3D Systems to create, I assume, some amazing things with chocolate. So, it shouldn’t come as a big surprise that Dutch company MELT is creating an the Icepop Generator to bring personalized ice pops to the public while educating them in 3D design technology. It appears, however, that the Icepop Generator works more on a carving and chiseling process rather than actually 3D printing an ice pop from frozen water but, it’s amazing nonetheless. Starting with a block of ice, the generator (which looks like many 3D printers with the twist of doubling as a freezer) has a sort of drill that moves back and forth along three axes, carving out the designated design, in effect, functioning as a mechanical sculptor. The Icepop Generator was just funded yesterday on Voordekunst—a Dutch funding platform similar to Kickstarter—so these pops are likely to be at a street fair or festival near you in the not-so-distant future. In the meantime the creative team at MELT has made several a pop, some in their own image. You can see how it works in this video:

via notcot and 3ders

DipJar: Ryder Kessler

Credit card tipping gadget DipJar by Ryder KesslerCredit card tipping gadget DipJar by Ryder KesslerCredit card tipping gadget DipJar by Ryder KesslerThe other day I passed by Fresco Gelateria/Café and was reminded of the last time I was in there with a friend who noticed an interesting gadget on their counter. “Meet DipJar—” as the sign reads, “the first ever tip jar for credit and debit cards.” This nicely designed (by industrial designer Simon Enever) stainless cylindrical vessel charges your credit card a dollar tip with one quick swipe or, more precisely, “dip” of your card. This clever product is the brainchild of Ryder Kessler who, after chatting with several baristas, learned that along with the uptick of credit and debit card use for small purchases came the plummeting of cash jar tips. In a world where printed currency is fast becoming a thing of the past, replaced by credit and bitcoins, this is just another example of smart design following in the footsteps of Square and the less successful waving-of-cell-phones for subway entry. This is good news for industrial designers! Bad news for cheapskates: not having change or singles is no longer a valid excuse to avoid tipping.

Pammy Pea by Pamella Lessero

Pammy Pea Children's Book on eating healthy, nutrition, by Pamella LesseroPammy Pea Children's Book on eating healthy, nutrition, by Pamella LesseroPammy Pea Children's Book on eating healthy, nutrition, by Pamella LesseroClick to enlarge

Our friend—as well as local NYC artist and lifelong vegetable lover—Pam Lessero just published a fun and friendly educational illustrated book for kids which focuses on the importance of eating healthy. The book’s protagonist (and Pamella’s alter ego?) Pammy Pea, “…wants to inspire and teach children everywhere to be healthy and eat all of their vegetables. When she is not dreaming of landing on your plate, you can find her happealy rolling around the garden with all her pea family and friends.”  Pammy Pea is targeted at the 3 to 6-year-old set and can be purchased over here. Stickers are available too, and a plush toy of Pammy Pea herself will follow shortly. You can follow Pammy Pea on facebook for updates too.

Gingerbread & Candy Art Museums

Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Louvre, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinGingerbread and Candy Art Museums, Guggenheim, Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin LevinClick to enlarge

Sure, it’s that time of year when visions of sugar plums dance in your head, and gingerbread houses abound. But New Zealand-born artist/photographer Henry Hargreaves based in Brooklyn and stylist/chef Caitlin Levin took their holiday creations to new heights. The two have collaborated on several projects in the past (Deep Fried Gadgets being a largely recognizable one,) but their latest collaboration took the form of Gingerbread and Candy Art Museums & Galleries for ArtBasel/Miami. These amazing models of the iconic institutions were made using gingerbread, hard candy, chocolate, licorice, and many other tasty sweets. Hargreaves and Levin made tabletop-size replicas of the Louvre, Guggenheim, Maxxi, Tate Modern, Karuizawa Gallery, MAS, and Soumaya and then cleverly lit and photographed each one.

You can see more of the process here.

via grit and neatorama

Rune Olsen: Will to Power

Rune Olsen, Will to Power exhibit at La Mama Gallery, NYC. Cheese-Ball Head Paper Towel Holder, Humorous SculptureRune Olsen, Will to Power exhibit at La Mama Gallery, NYC. Endless Column, Tower of styrofoam takeout containers, Humorous SculptureRune Olsen, Will to Power exhibit at La Mama Gallery, NYC. Endless Column, Tower of styrofoam takeout containers, Humorous SculptureClick to enlarge

It’s hard to know what to make of the wacky exhibit Will to Power at La Mama Gallery here in NYC, but it’s definitely engaging. Norwegian artist Rune Olsen, now living in Hudson, NY, is interested in what he refers to as “Alternative Intelligences” such as ADHD, Asperger’s, Dyslexia and Bipolar disorder. He questions what functionality would look like if “the norm” were one of these alternative intelligences.

Using mostly food and kitchen-centric objects, Olsen creates pieces that include a Cheese-ball Head that conveniently doubles as a paper towel holder; a leaning tower of take-out containers titled Endless Column; a kitchen counter in the center of the gallery with a person covered in foil and dishes stacked precariously by the sink in a piece titled Endless Water Fall, just to name a few. The entire space has foam sausages flying through the air as well and, apparently, at times there are performances in the space, though not while I was there.

In some ways meme-like, the artist seems to favor that comparison. He speaks of the idea of evoking “a visceral response in the viewer, a response that elicits a desire to imitate thus initiating a first hand experience and making them personal.”

Will to Power will be up at La Mama La Galleria through November 17, 2013. Open Wednesday to Sunday 1 to 7:30pm.

Photos: collabcubed